The Japanese Kai Ken is a very interesting and unusual dog breed, but the Kai Ken temperament is not for everyone.

The Kai Ken, also known as the Kai Dog or the Tiger Dog, is one of the six native breeds from Japan.

Experts explain that the Kai Ken temperament can be primitive and wild. These dogs require a lot of socialization, or they can easily revert back to their natural states.

As the president of the North American Kai Association put it

“This is not a lab and it will not react well to new situations and experiences without tons of proper socialization and training.”

If you are thinking about adding a Tiger Dog to your home, do as much research as you can to make sure you thoroughly understand Kai Ken traits.

This article will help you take the first steps towards familiarizing yourself with typical Kai Ken behaviors.

Understanding the Kai Ken Temperament: 5 Crucial Components of the Kai Ken Personality

Below you will read about classic Kai Ken temperament components.

However, as you read the article, please remember that there will always be some variations between individual dogs within a certain breed. Therefore, not every Kai Ken will exhibit the exact same behaviors.

1. Keen and Alert

The Kai Ken breed is very watchful and alert.

These dogs are always keeping an eye on their whereabouts.

Due to these traits, Kai Ken make excellent watchdogs. They will naturally guard the homestead and bark to alert their masters of any intruders.

Kai Ken have keen eyesight and excellent hearing.

2. Aloof with Strangers

The watchful Kai Ken temperament makes this breed distrustful of strangers at first.

If you have guests visit your home, make sure you instruct your friends not to reach for your Kai Ken too fast.

Instead, have visitors toss treats to your dog and let him investigate them on his own terms and at his own pace.

3. Smart but Independent

Intelligence is a key component of the Kai Ken temperament.

These dogs are very clever and crafty.

However, they are also independent thinkers. They will not blindly follow orders.

Some owners describe them as stubborn because these dogs like to think for themselves. It takes patience and creativity to train Kai Ken.

It is important to provide your Kai Ken with mental stimulation so your dog does not become bored.

A bored dog will display unwanted behaviors such as chewing, barking or digging.

Provide plenty of mental enrichment in the form of training as well as brain game toys like Kongs.

4. Clean

The fastidious Kai Ken temperament makes this breed a very clean breed.

These dogs are known for being dainty and refined. They do not usually get dirty or muddy.

Kai Ken rarely have a “doggy odor.”

They need only occasional baths and grooming.

They are sometimes described as “cat-like” in their habits.

5. Suitable for Apartment Living

One nice aspect of the Kai Ken temperament is its adaptability to apartment life.

Kai Ken are quiet dogs. They are not major barkers or howlers.

They are not known for being destructive, although any dog can chew when bored or anxious.

Kai Ken can also adapt to small living spaces as long as they receive daily exercise.

Kai Ken exercise needs depend on the age of the dog.

Young Kai Ken need an opportunity to run and play on a daily basis. If you don’t have a yard, you can bring them to a dog park or a doggie daycare.

Older Kai Ken are content with leashed walks in the neighborhood.

Check out 10 other breeds that are suitable for apartment living.

A Brief Account of Kai Ken History

Kai Ken have been living in Japan for hundreds of years.

The first Kai Ken in America were sent as a gift to the Utah Zoo in the 1950s.

American serviceman also brought some Kai Ken home to the United States after being stationed in Japan.

The United Kennel Club of Great Britain recognized the Kai Ken, but the American Kennel Club has not yet inducted the breed.

Kai Ken Size and Appearance

The Kai Ken is a medium-sized dog with pointy ears and a tightly curled tail.

The average Kai Ken height at the withers is between 15.5 and 19.5 inches.

The typical Kai Ken weight range is between 20 lbs and 40 lbs. Males are usually larger than females.

Kai Ken colors can be brindle (Chu-Tora), black brindle (Kuro-Tora) or red brindle (Aka-Tora).

A Guide to Kai Ken Training

It is very important to devote ample time to properly training and socializing your Kai Ken.

The Kai Ken temperament is intelligent. However the Kai Ken temperament is also independent.

Therefore, these dogs can be challenging to train.

If possible, sign up for a puppy socialization class or an obedience class with your dog at an early age.

Puppy Pre-K is a great way for your puppy to learn valuable social skills.

Helpful Dog Training Resource:

For help with training your Kai Ken dog, you should take a look at The Online Dog Trainer by Doggy Dan. Doggy Dan is an expert Dog Trainer based in New Zealand. His online resource contains Hundreds of Excellent Dog Training Videos that will take you step-by-step through the process of developing a healthy, happy well-behaved dog.

Try to find a trainer that uses positive, force-free methods.

Steer clear of trainers that use “dominance-based” methods or employ painful tools such as shock collars, pinch collars or choke chains.

These methods will damage your relationship with your new pet.

Instead, find fun and creative ways to motivate your Kai Ken and keep him engaged. This form of training will be more enjoyable for you and for your dog.

A Guide to Kai Ken Grooming Needs

Kai Ken are generally clean, odorless dogs. They require baths and grooming only rarely.

Kai Ken have a thick double coat. So their fur does shed profusely twice a year during shedding season.

During this time, try to brush them daily.

Is the Kai Ken hypoallergenic?

No this breed is not hypoallergenic.

If you suffer from allergies or you are averse to dog shedding, this might not be the right breed for you.

Check out this article for a list of dog breeds that are hypoallergenic.

Staying Healthy: Kai Ken Health Issues

Kai Dogs are generally healthy, but like all dogs they can be prone to certain genetic disorders.

If you purchase your Kai Ken from a breeder, talk with the breeder about genetic health tests. Responsible breeders should have their breeding dogs screened for hip issues, eye issues, and other common conditions. Ask to see medical records for the parents of the litter and talk with the breeder about a health guarantee for the puppy.

Before you bring home a Kai Ken, talk with your veterinarian about common health issues so that you can be on the watch for the early warning signs.

Some health issues that can occur in this breed include:

Like all breeds, your Kai Ken should visit a licensed veterinarian at least once per year for a wellness checkup and annual vaccinations.

Helpful Dog Health Resource

Note: Don't let the many issues above scare you. The best way to approach health problems is to prevent them in the first place. The Ultimate Guide to Dog Health is a great place to start. Get a copy to keep at home. It will help you prevent the painful health issues that can plague your lovely Canaan pet from expressing his winning personality and maximizing his life expectancy.

It is vital to keep your Kai Ken up to date on flea prevention, tick prevention and heartworm prevention at all times.

Spaying and neutering is highly encouraged to prevent inadvertently adding to the pet overpopulation problem in the United States. In fact, most quality breeders will require you to sign a spay/neuter contract agreeing to get your pet altered at an appropriate age. Good breeders never want their puppies’ offspring to end up in animal shelters or on the streets. Talk with your veterinarian about scheduling this procedure at the appropriate time for your pet.

With excellent care and nutrition, the Kai Ken lifespan can reach 12-15 years.

Kai Ken Rescue and Adoption

If you believe that the Kai Ken temperament is a good match for your lifestyle, it is time to start researching the best way to add one to your family.

One great option is to adopt a Kai Ken that is in need of a new home.

Dogs enter rescue organizations for many different reasons. Usually the dog is not at fault. Rather, it is usually the result of unexpected circumstances such as:

  • Financial Hardship
  • Owner Illness or Death
  • Moving
  • Landlord Restrictions
  • Divorce
  • New Baby
  • Loss of job and/or eviction

There are many benefits to adopting a dog through a rescue organization. Some of the perks include:

  • Dogs are usually older and past the destructive puppy stage
  • Temperaments are more established, so you know what you are getting
  • Dogs frequently come with prior training, including housetraining
  • Adoption fees are substantially cheaper than purchasing a puppy from a breeder
  • You get to save a life by adopting a dog in need

If you decide to look for a Kai Ken for adoption, you can use internet websites such as Google, Facebook, Petfinder, Adoptapet and/or Getyourpet.

You can also contact the national Kai Ken club and ask for referrals to rescue organizations.

Although Kai Ken are rare in animal shelters, you never know what you might find at your local animal shelter or humane society.

It is always worth a visit to speak with the staff and leave an application on file. The staff can contact you if a Kai Ken or a Kai Ken mix or a similar breed becomes available.

When you adopt through a rescue organization, the adoption fee is usually between $100 and $300 depending on the organization. This fee usually includes spay/neuter, vaccinations and an exam from a veterinarian.

Finding Kai Ken for Sale from a Reputable Breeder

Some people choose to purchase a Kai Ken puppy from a breeder.

Just be careful if you go this route because there are some unscrupulous breeders that will take advantage of unsuspecting buyers.

Avoid the Tiger Dog Scam

Recently there have been reports of unethical breeders actually painting stripes on mixed breed puppies to make them look like “Tiger Dogs.”

Tragically, the paint is sometimes toxic to the puppies and it can cause them to become very ill or even die.

Do not be hoodwinked by adorable photos on a website. Always insist on seeing the puppies in person before you pay.

Many unsuspecting buyers have had their hearts broken by this horrendous behavior. Although this particular scam is more prevalent in Asia, it is still important for American buyers to use caution.

Avoid Puppy Mills

Puppy Mills are large-scale breeding operations that churn out purebred puppies with no regard to the animals’ health, temperament or humane living conditions. Sadly, puppy mills are prevalent in the United States.

The best way to avoid being tricked by a puppy mill is to make sure that you visit the breeder in person.

That way, you can inspect the property, meet the breeding dogs and make sure that the operation is clean, humane and not overcrowded.

Never purchase Kai Ken puppies over the internet or through pet stores. Be very wary of any breeder that wants to take your money over the phone or internet without meeting face to face.

Get Referrals for Good Breeders

Contact the Kai Ken Society of America or the North American Kai Association for a list of recommended Kai Ken breeders.

Keep in mind that this is a rare breed, so there may not be any breeders in your state. Be prepared to travel to acquire one of these dogs.

Once you find a potential breeder, make an appointment to visit in person. Ask for a tour of the property and ask to meet the adult dogs living in the home. Make sure the breeding dogs appear to be healthy, friendly specimens of the breed.

Good breeders will welcome your visit. They will want an opportunity to meet you and ask you questions. Good breeders want to make sure that you are prepared to provide a lifelong home for one of their puppies.

Since there are so few Kai Ken breeders in the United States, you probably will not be able to bring home a new puppy immediately. You will probably be placed on a waiting list.

Since these puppies are so scarce, they are also expensive. The Kai Ken price from a high quality breeder will probably be around $1500.

Conclusion: Why the Kai Ken?

The fascinating Kai Ken temperament makes this breed very desirable in certain crowds.

Kai Ken are beautiful, rare, mysterious dogs. They have an intriguing primitiveness about them.

If you think the Kai Ken personality is a good match for your lifestyle, try to learn as much as you can about their behavior and care.

Before you bring home one of these exquisite Tiger Dogs, make sure you are prepared for the commitment of training and socializing this striking dog from Japan.

The Hanover Hound temperament is best described as hard-working, steady, loyal to its owner, and aloof with strangers. And If you are active and outdoorsy, the answer to whether there's a good match might be Yes!

The Hanover Hound, also known as the Hanoverian Scent Hound, is a large hunting hound that originated in Germany. The Hanover Hound is descended from medieval European Bloodhound breeds.

Like most working breeds, the Hanover Hound does best in an active household where he will receive daily exercise, training, and mental enrichment.

This breed is not well suited for apartment living and does not adapt well to city life. This breed does best in a rural setting where he has plenty of space to exercise and explore.

If you are thinking about acquiring a Hanover Hound, do your research to make sure the Hanover Hound temperament will be a good fit for your lifestyle.

Talk with Hanover Hound owners and breeders to prepare yourself for common Hanover Hound behaviors.

Understanding the Hanover Hound Temperament: 5 Common Hanover Hound Traits

This article will help you get a better sense of the Hanover Hound temperament.

However, please keep in mind that there are always subtle differences between individual dogs.

Therefore, your Hanover Hound may not display all of these behavioral traits.

1. Powerful Sense of Smell

The Hanover Hound has an extremely powerful nose.

These dogs love to follow their noses and explore.

It is important to keep Hanover Hounds on a leash or in an enclosed area so that they do not wander off following a scent.

Even a well-trained dog may not heed your commands if they are on the trail of a, particularly interesting smell.

This can be an extremely dangerous situation if your dog becomes lost or wanders across a busy street.

2. Loyal to Family

The devoted Hanover Hound temperament makes this breed extremely loyal to his master.

The Hanover Hound is a breed that loves to be with its family. This type of dog is not happy being banished to the backyard or a kennel.

If you add a Hanover Hound to your household, make sure you are prepared to spend lots of time with your pet.

Separation anxiety can occur in this breed. If your Hanover Hound displays any symptoms of separation anxiety, be sure to seek assistance from your veterinarian and/or a professional trainer.

3. Wary of Strangers

The Hanover Hound temperament is sometimes described as aloof or discerning towards strangers.

These dogs take some time to warm up to new people, and they will not accept someone into their “pack” right away.

When you have visitors come over, make sure you let them know not to push your dog to accept them to fast.

Ask your guests to offer treats to your dog and let him warm up to them at his own speed.

The watchful Hanover Hound temperament makes this breed an excellent watchdog.

Your Hanover Hound will keep a close eye on your property and alert you to any suspicious behavior.

4. Needs a Job

The Hanover Hound was bred to be a working dog.

These dogs are happiest when they have a job to do.

Do not expect your Hanover Hound to lie around the house all day.

These are very large, active, athletic hounds.

If you add one to your household, make sure you lead an active lifestyle.

Hanover Hounds that do not receive enough exercise will become bored and destructive. They may start exhibiting nuisance behaviors such as barking, chewing and digging.

If you would like to provide your Hanover Hound with a job, you and your dog can get involved with search and rescue work, therapy work, nosework, or game tracking.

5. Independent Thinkers

The Hanover Hound is smart but independent.

This can make training a challenge.

Some owners describe their Hanover Hounds as “stubborn” or “willful.”

You will need to come up with creative ways to motivate your Hanover Hound to follow your instructions.

You can keep your Hanover Hound engaged by providing him with mental enrichment to exercise his mind.

A Brief Account of Hanover Hound History

The Hanover Hound originated in Germany.

The breed descended from the Liam Hound, which was an ancient hunting hound from the Middle Ages.

Today, the Hanover Hound is primarily used as a tracking hound for finding wounded game—particularly game such as deer and elk.

Hanover Hound tracking abilities have become finely honed for this particular task.

A national breed club was established in Germany in 1894.

Although the breed is not yet recognized by the American Kennel Club, it is recognized by other kennel clubs in Europe.

The breed is extremely rare in America, but it is highly prized by those who know about it and love it.

Hanover Hound Size and Appearance

The breed standard of the Hanover Hound describes it as, “medium size, well proportioned and powerful.”

One distinctive feature is a wrinkled forehead that gives it a serious expression.

The typical Hanover Hound height is between 19 and 21 inches at the withers.

The average Hanover Hound weight is between 79 pounds and 99 pounds. Males are both heavier and taller than females.

Hanover Hound colors can be light deer-red, dark deer-red or brindled. Some have a darker mask around their eyes. Small patches of white on the chest are acceptable.

Hanover Hounds have long ears and tails.

A Guide to Hanover Hound Training

As was mentioned earlier, the independent Hanover Hound temperament can make this breed challenging to train.

Try to start training your Hanover Hound as early as possible.

If you acquire your Hanover Hound as a puppy, try to sign up for a puppy socialization class or puppy kindergarten class.

Puppy Pre-K is a great way to start bonding with your new dog and it is also a great way for your puppy to learn valuable canine social skills.

If you adopt your Hanover Hound as an adult, sign up for a basic obedience class with a positive reinforcement trainer.

Helpful Dog Training Resource:

For help with training your Hanover Hound dog take a look at The Online Dog Trainer by Doggy Dan. Doggy Dan is an expert Dog Trainer based in New Zealand. His online resource contains Hundreds of Excellent Dog Training Videos that will take you step-by-step through the process of developing a healthy, happy well-behaved dog.

Make sure you find a trainer that uses positive, force-free methods. This type of training is science-based and it is both effective and humane.

Avoid trainers that use outdated dominance-based methods. These methods are less effective and they can damage your relationship with your new pet. Do not work with any trainer that uses painful tools such as prong collars, choke chains or shock collars.

The Hanover Hound learns best with short, upbeat training sessions throughout the day.

Dogs learn throughout their whole lives, so you will need to continue training your dog for life.

Hanover Hound Grooming Needs

When it comes to grooming, Hanover Hounds are fairly low maintenance dogs.

They have short coats that benefit from occasional brushing and bathing to stay shiny and healthy.

Their toenails should be clipped regularly and their teeth should be brushed on a regular basis.

Their long, droopy ears can be prone to ear infections, so it is important to keep them clean and try. Check the ears frequently for signs of debris or infection.

Is the Hanover Hound hypoallergenic?

This breed is not hypoallergenic.

Please consult this article if you are looking for a breed that is hypoallergenic.

Staying Healthy: Hanover Hound Health Issues

The majority of Hanover Hounds are healthy dogs.

However, all dogs can be prone to genetic health conditions.

If you purchase a puppy from a breeder, talk with the breeder about what health screenings they provide.

Before you bring home your new dog, talk with your veterinarian about the following health concerns so that you can be on the watch for early warning signs:

Like all breeds of dog, your Hanoverian Scent Hound should visit a licensed veterinarian at least once per year for a physical exam and annual vaccinations.

It is extremely important for your Hanover Hound to stay up to date on flea prevention, tick prevention, and heartworm prevention at all times. Talk with your vet about the best medications for your dog.

Spaying and neutering is highly encouraged to prevent accidental litters. Speak with your vet about scheduling this procedure at the optimum time for your pet. Many breeders will require that you have this procedure done and they will ask you to sign a contract binding you to that agreement.

With excellent care and nutrition the average Hanover Hound lifespan is between 10 and 14 years.

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Hanover Hound Rescue and Adoption

If you believe that the Hanover Hound temperament would be a good fit for your lifestyle, the next step is to find a dog or puppy to add to your family.

Hanover Hounds are fairly rare in the United States, so finding one may be difficult.

One option is to look for a Hanover Hound for adoption.

Many people prefer to adopt dogs because there are already so many homeless dogs in shelters and rescue groups looking for homes. It is nice to provide a home for a dog in need rather than purchase a puppy and encourage breeders to continue bringing more puppies into the world.

There are also some perks to adopting a dog. Dogs that are up for adoption are usually older and past the destructive puppy stage. They often come with some prior training including potty training. They are not as active, so they are ideal for people who have busier work schedules and cannot devote as much time to training and exercising a puppy. Plus, the adoption fee for rescue dogs is considerably less than the price tag of a puppy from a breeder.

You can look for available Hanover Hounds on internet websites such as Google, Facebook, Petfinder, Adoptapet and Getyourpet.

You can also visit your local animal shelter or humane society.

Although Hanover Hounds are rare in American Animal shelters, you might find a mixed breed or a similar breed that is the perfect match for your home.

You can also leave your name and contact information on file with the staff in case a Hanover Hound becomes available in the future.

Finding a Hanover Hound for Sale from a Reputable Breeder

Another option is to purchase a Hanover Hound puppy from a breeder.

Just be careful because not all dog breeders are responsible breeders. There are some unethical breeders out there that will try to take advantage of unknowing puppy buyers.

Never purchase Hanover Hound puppies through an internet site or from a pet store. Be very wary of breeders that want to take your money over the phone or over the internet without meeting face to face.

Try to get referrals of Hanover Hound breeders from current Hanover Hound owners or from the American Kennel Club.

Once you identify a possible breeder, make arrangements to visit that breeder in person. Since there are so few Hanover Hound breeders in this country, you will probably have to travel to acquire one of these dogs.

Ask the breeder about the health and temperament of their breeding dogs. Tour the facility to make sure that it is clean, humane and not overcrowded.

The breeder will probably have a list of questions for you as well. A good breeder will want to make sure that you are prepared to provide a lifelong home for one of their puppies.

Since this breed is so uncommon, a puppy probably will not be available right away. You may have to be placed on a waiting list for a year or more.

Since they are so rare, Hanoverian Scenthound puppies are also quite expensive. The average Hanover Hound price is $1500 for a companion dog. It will be even more for a show quality or working quality hound.

Conclusion: Why the Hanover Hound?

The Hanover Hound temperament makes this breed an outstanding choice for hunting, search and rescue work, or tracking work.

However, if you are looking for a couch potato companion pet, the Hanover Hound may not be the best breed for you.

If you bring one of these dogs into your life, make sure you are prepared to invest the time and energy they need to stay happy and healthy.

If you are considering this breed as a family pet, understanding the Austrian Pinscher temperament is a must. He can be a loyal and friendly family dog, but he can also be a training challenge.

This breed is not a good choice for the beginning dog owner. He has a dominant personality that needs a firm guiding hand.

The Austrian Pinscher temperament is naturally friendly to people and dogs he knows, but he needs early socialization. He can be aggressive toward unknown dogs and strangers. He has also been known to bite.

Austrian Pinscher Temperament and Personality

Intelligent

This is a smart dog who learns quickly. But this doesn’t mean he obeys without question.

Stubborn

The Austrian Pinscher temperament can be stubborn. He has a strong mind of his own and can be a training challenge. When properly trained, though, most will be obedient.

Devoted

He is loyal and loving to his family. He takes his role as family protector seriously.

Dominant

This guy wants to be in charge. He needs firm and early training to learn that he is not the boss.

Friendly

The Austrian Pinscher temperament is sweet and friendly to people he knows. But he can be suspicious of strangers and needs early socialization to them.

Affectionate

He can be a good family companion. He has great affection for his family members and is happy to show it.

Gentle

The Austrian Pinscher temperament is naturally gentle. He is very good with children.

Playful

His playfulness also makes this dog a good companion for the kids. They will tire out long before he does.

Lively

The Austrian Pinscher temperament is outgoing, energetic, and fun-loving.

Active

Even when the Austrian Pinscher is tired out, he will continue to be busy. He needs a lot of exercise.

Assertive

He has no trouble making his wants and needs known. Again, he needs firm early training or he can become unmanageable.

Alert

The Austrian Pinscher temperament is always alert to what’s going on in his environment. He is a barker, a habit you may want to work on in training when he is young.

Suspicious of Strangers

The Austrian Pinscher breed standard also refers to this breed as an “incorruptible” guard dog.  

His first line of defense against strangers is to bark. But he will become aggressive if he feels he is pushed to it. He has been known to bite.

Without proper socialization, the Austrian Pinscher can easily become overprotective.

Prey Drive

As a breed created to hunt vermin, he can’t be trusted around small family pets. He may do okay with cats if they are brought up together.

Occasional Aggression

The Austrian Pinscher temperament is not generally aggressive. However, as above, he may act aggressively toward strangers in extreme circumstances.

He can also show aggressive behavior toward other dogs at times. That is not the norm for this breed, but he must be socialized with other dogs from the very beginning.

Austrian Pinscher History

Lineage

As his name suggests, the Austrian Pinscher originated in Austria.  It was originally called Österreichischer Kurzhaarpinscher (Austrian Shorthaired Pinscher).

In 2000, the Austrian Kennel Club renamed the breed to Österreichischer Pinscher (or OP). You may also hear it referred to as the Austrian Farm Dog.

Dog historians believe that its roots go back to ancient breeds. Some trace it back to a more recent versatile farm dog called the Landpinscher.

There has been more variation in the Austrian Pinscher appearance than in most purebreds. This is because there have never been any pet or show lines of this dog. He was bred only for his utility as a farm dog, not for conformation.

His working life has consisted of various jobs on the farm. He has worked as a cattle dog, watchdog, ratter, and guard dog. He was used to protect cattle, people, and property.

Near Extinction

By the end of the 1800s, the Industrial Revolution had decreased the need for farm dogs. They nearly became extinct at that time. An Austrian named Emil Hauck made it his mission to reestablish the breed.

In the 1940s, World War II nearly decimated the breed once again. By the 1970s, the breed was just one dog from extinction.

The only remaining breeding female, Diocles of Angern, was crossbred with other Pinscher breeds. Their lineages are mostly unknown. However, these crosses produced the foundation stock that established the breed as we know it now.

In 1928, the Austrian Kennel Club recognized the breed as the Austrian Short-haired Pinscher. the United Kennel Club (UKC) recognized it in 2006.

The Austrian Pinscher is still a rare breed. There are few remaining, and most of them are in Austria. But this is gradually changing.

Their home breed club, the Klub für Österreichische Pinscher (KOP), is working hard to bring the breed back.

Austrian Pinscher Training

The Austrian Pinscher temperament can make him very challenging to train. He learns quickly and easily, but he is independent-minded.

He has a naturally dominant nature, so he will challenge his owner’s authority. This breed needs a firm, consistent trainer who won’t let him get away with it.

The Austrian Pinscher is a poor choice for the beginning dog owner. Anyone who can’t or chooses not to be a firm leader would also be better off with another breed.

Helpful Dog Training Resource:

For help with training your Austrian Pinscher dog, you should take a look at The Online Dog Trainer by Doggy Dan. Doggy Dan is an expert Dog Trainer based in New Zealand. His online resource contains Hundreds of Excellent Dog Training Videos that will take you step-by-step through the process of developing a healthy, happy well-behaved dog.

The Austrian Pinscher needs early and consistent socialization. He is naturally good with children, but he needs to learn how to live with other dogs and smaller pets.

If he is not raised with other pets or socialized to them early, he is not well suited to homes with other animals.

Because of his dominant nature, he would not do well in families that already have a dog.

If you don’t want an overprotective watchdog who may bite, you will need to socialize him early to strangers as well. Otherwise you’re likely to see these negative Austrian Pinscher behaviors.

Austrian Pinscher Appearance

General Appearance

The Austrian Pinscher is a medium-sized dog with a muscular build and a broad chest. He has a stockier body than his ancestor, the German Pinscher. It is sturdy and rectangular-shaped.

He has a double coat that is short to medium length and straight.

The head is pear-shaped, and he has a short, strong neck. His ears are small- to medium-sized and hanging, sometimes called “button” ears. The muzzle is short. He has dark eyes and a black nose.

The tail is short and curls slightly upward. It is often docked.

Austrian Pinscher Colors

Again, there is a lot of variety in this breed. He can be black, brown, fawn, black and tan (also called black and gold), or brindle. He often has white markings.

Austrian Pinscher Size

There can also be variation in the size of the Austrian Pinscher. The average Austrian Pinscher weight is 26 to 40 pounds for both males and females.

Austrian Pinscher height averages 17 to 20 inches for males, 17 to 19 inches for females.

Austrian Pinscher Lifespan

The Austrian Pinscher’s life expectancy is 12-14 years.

Austrian Pinscher Health Issues

There is not much information available about the genetic health of the breed. However, they appear to have no major breed-specific conditions.

Conditions that occur rarely and should be monitored include:

  • Hip dysplasia. This is a malformation of the hip that can lead to arthritis and loss of function.
  • Heart disease. You will want to learn the symptoms of common heart issues in dogs.

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Caring for the Austrian Pinscher

Austrian Pinscher Grooming

Because of its double coat, this breed is an average to heavy shedder. He will need brushing once or twice a week. He should be bathed only when necessary.

Austrian Pinscher Diet

He has no specific dietary concerns. The Austrian Pinscher should do just fine on any high-quality food.

Austrian Pinscher Exercise

The Austrian Pinscher is an intelligent, busy dog who needs physical and mental stimulation to be content.

He is a working breed used to a lot of activity. He needs a high level of exercise and room to run and play.

The Austrian Pinscher was bred for farm living. He does not make a good city or apartment dog. While the acreage of a farm would be his ideal living condition, he will also do well with a large yard.

He needs 45 minutes to an hour of exercise every day. With his great endurance, hiking and long walks are good choices for him.

He is a fast runner. Some owners find that riding a bicycle while he runs alongside is the best way to keep up with him.

He will also enjoy dog sports such as agility and rally.

Without enough space or exercise, this breed can be very destructive and will bark—a lot.

Exercise can benefit dogs that develop bad behaviors.

Finding an Austrian Pinscher

Buying an Austrian Pinscher from a Breeder

The Austrian Pinscher is a very rare breed. If you are looking for an Austrian Pinscher for sale, you will need patience. Expect to be put on a waiting list.

You will also need to be careful. If you do find a breeder, the Austrian breed restoration program warns to beware of Austrian Pinscher puppies bred by the “rare breed” pet market.

They recommend being sure to check the breed standard, available from the Federation Cynologique Internationale (FCI). You will want to be sure the Austrian Pinscher puppy you are considering is a proper representative of the breed.

There are Internet dog registries and “minor kennel clubs” who release their own breed standards. These may or may not be in compliance with the official standard.

Chances are you will not be able to trust that these dogs will have the Austrian Pinscher traits and temperament that you are expecting.

They may be crossbred with another breed and not be the purebred you are expecting. Worse, they may be inbred or bred with a dog with unknown health or genetic soundness.

You should always get a trustworthy recommendation before buying a dog from an online breeder. The best way to do this is to join online forums or Facebook groups for your breed.

You can then talk to other Austrian Pinscher owners and get names of responsible breeders. It would also be a great opportunity to ask any questions you may have about the breed.

Site Visit

If you’re lucky enough to find a breeder, you should plan a site visit if possible. You will want to be sure the puppies are healthy-looking and the facilities are clean.

You will want to ask about the health history of the puppies and parents. A good breeder will have this information going back several generations.

A reputable breeder will also give you a health guarantee and lifetime support for your Austrian Pinscher. They will also offer to take the dog back if any time you need to surrender him.

Austrian Pinscher price appears to be between $300 and $500. This may not be a reliable figure, however, because there are so few available.

Austrian Pinscher Rescue/Adoption

If you would prefer to find an Austrian Pinscher for adoption, your wait may be even longer. At the time of this writing, there are no Austrian Pinscher rescues online. You could try to generalize your search to rescues that work with all Pinschers.

You would be very unlikely to find a Austrian Pinscher in a shelter. They are simply too rare.

Is the Austrian Pinscher the Right Breed for You?

He was once a hard-working farm dog, but the Austrian Pinscher is now more of a family dog. And he can make a good one, but only if he gets proper training and socialization.

This intelligent but independent breed is not for everyone. If you live in a rural environment with lots of space or a house with a large backyard, you might want to consider an Austrian Pinscher.

He will need a lot of time and attention, however. You would need to commit to giving him plenty of exercise and mental stimulation.

Keep in mind that he must be socialized to strangers early and well to prevent aggression and biting.

If you have other pets in the home, you may want to think about another breed.

But if you think he sounds like a good fit for your family, the Austrian Pinscher has a lot going for him. The affectionate and loyal nature of the Austrian Pinscher temperament can make him a loving family companion.

If you are a hunter of Small Game looking for a canine partner, the Austrian Black and Tan Hound temperament may be just what you need.

If you would like your hunting partner to also be a great family dog, you couldn’t do much better than the Austrian Black and Tan.

The Austrian Black and Tan is a friendly, obedient family dog who’s easy to train. However, unless you’re a hunter, it could be very difficult to give the Austrian Hound the kind of life she needs.

She’s a great family dog, but she’s a hunter first.

The Austrian Black and Tan Hound Temperament

Intelligent

The Austrian Black and Tan Hound is smart and easily trained.

Obedient

Unlike many intelligent dogs, the Austrian Black and Tan Hound temperament does not include a strong independent streak. She’s happy to do what her owner asks when hunting and at home.

Even-tempered

The Austrian Black and Tan Hound temperament is very good-natured and easy to get along with. She enjoys people.

Social

She needs to be around people and is not happy to be alone for long periods. She can be prone to separation anxiety.

Friendly

The Austrian Black and Tan Hound temperament is friendly with strangers and not suspicious. She would not make a good watchdog.

Affectionate

She’s happy to get loving attention from her people and equally happy to return it.

Playful

The Austrian Black and Tan Hound temperament is enthusiastic. She loves to play and gets along very well with children.

Vocal

The Austrian Black and Tan Hound isn’t really a barker, but if she smells something she wants to chase, she will bay or howl. This is an instinctive behavior that can be hard to control.

Active

Even though she loves to be with her people, don’t expect this breed to be happy lying around the house. The Austrian Black and Tan Hound temperament needs active companionship, preferably a hunting life.

Energetic and Hardy

She can hunt all day in high altitudes without difficulty.

Agile

She is graceful and known for her smooth running style over mountainous terrain. Her agility is unusual for hound breeds.

Hard-working

This breed is a hard-working hunter, and the Austrian Black and Tan Hound temperament is persistent and enthusiastic about getting the job done.

High Prey Instinct

Smaller household pets may not be safe around this hunting breed. With good early socialization, she may be taught to tolerate small pets that she’s brought up with.

Pack Animal

The Austrian Black and Tan Hound temperament is great with other dogs. As a pack hunter, most prefer to live and work with other canines.

Austrian Black and Tan Hound History

As her name suggests, the Austrian Black and Tan Hound originated in Austria. Her exact lineage is not known.

Many believe she is descended from very old Celtic hounds who are now extinct. The Austrian Hound breed can be traced back to the mid-1800s.

There are three Austrian hounds, or Grand Brackes (“large hounds”) The Austrian Black and Tan Hound belongs to this group. The others are the Styrian Coarse-haired Hound and the Tyrolean Hound.

These three hounds were interbred for hundreds of years. In 1884, the Austrian Black and Tan Hound began to be recognized as its own breed.

In her homeland, the Austrian Black and Tan Hound hunts in the Austrian Alps as part of a pack. As a scent hound, she is most skilled as a tracker who works at tracking wounded animals, mostly Foxes, and Rabbits.

She is an excellent runner. Her running gait is often referred to as elegant or stylish. She is also prized for her silent hunting skills, unlike most hounds.

She is a born-and-bred hunter and is rarely kept as a family pet by Austrians.

Austrian Black and Tan Hound Training

This breed is very smart and easy to train. In fact, she is generally a fast learner compared to other hound breeds.

The Austrian Black and Tan Hound temperament is obedient and eager to please. She is not dominant or aggressive. Even so, she still needs firm guidance in training and socialization to be a good house pet.

Her work ethic is very powerful. Her strong prey drive and excellent scenting skills can also cause a training issue. She is easily distracted when she catches an irresistible scent and will want to run to chase it.

Helpful Dog Training Resource:

For help with training your Austrian Black and Tan Hound, you should take a look at The Online Dog Trainer by Doggy Dan. Doggy Dan is an expert Dog Trainer based in New Zealand. His online resource contains Hundreds of Excellent Dog Training Videos that will take you step-by-step through the process of developing a healthy, happy well-behaved dog.

It’s best to remember that this is a pack dog who is used to having a pack leader. She needs you to be that leader.

If you or another member of your family are not willing to be firm and in control, this breed is not a good choice for you. Neither you nor the dog will be happy.

You also need to know that if the Austrian Black and Tan Hound is neglected or mistreated, she may become aggressive. The same may be true if she is not properly trained or socialized.

However, aggression is not a natural Austrian Black and Tan Hound trait if all of her needs are met.

The bottom line for the Austrian Black and Tan Hound is that she should be placed with hunting families only.

It is possible for her to do well with a very active outdoors family. But in that situation, you would need a strong commitment to meet her work, training, socialization, and exercise needs.

Austrian Black and Tan Hound Appearance

This is a medium to large breed with a slender build and broad chest. Her coat is black with tan markings. Her coat is short, smooth, and silky.

She has a good-sized head. Her ears are high-set, medium-length, flat, and hanging. They have rounded tips. She has brown eyes, a black nose, and a scissor bite.

Her long tail is bent upward and gently tapers near the end.

Austrian Black and Tan Hound Size

Weight is 35 to 60 pounds. Austrian Black and Tan Hound height is 19 to 22 inches. Females are noticeably smaller than males.

Must-Knows

Austrian Black and Tan Hound Lifespan

This breed has a life expectancy of 12 to 15 years.

Other Names

  • Austrian Brandlbracke, a combination of Brandl, which means fire, and bracke, or hunting dog.
  • Vieräugl, German for four eyes, referring to the tan markings over her eyes.
  • Austrian Hound.
  • Austrian Smooth-coated Hound.
  • Osterreischische Glattaarige in Germany.

Austrian Black and Tan Coonhound versus Black and Tan Coonhound

The Austrian Black and Tan Hound is similar to the Black and Tan Coonhound.

Origin

The Coonhound originates from the United States. The Austrian, obviously from its name, comes from Europe.

How they Compare Physically

Physically, the Austrian Black and Tan Hound and the Black and Tan Coonhound are similar, but the Austrian Hound has a slimmer, more streamlined body built for speed.

The Coonhound is larger and more muscular. As a larger dog, the Coonhound has a shorter lifespan at 10-12 years.

Key Personality Differences

The biggest difference between the two is in their personalities. The Black and Tan Coonhound has an independent streak that the Austrian Hound temperament does not generally include.

The Coonhound can be a lot more stubborn. Of course, this means that the Coonhound is a little more challenging to train.

Austrian Black and Tan Hound Health Issues

This is a robust, healthy breed. They are prone to hip dysplasia, as many larger breeds are, and ear infections. Their ears must be checked periodically and cleaned often (some say daily).

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Caring for the Austrian Black and Tan Hound

Austrian Black and Tan Hound Grooming

The Austrian Hound is a heavy shedder. She will need brushing at least once a week. Bathe her only when it’s necessary.

Like all dogs, she will need her nails trimmed and teeth brushed often. As above, her ears need special attention.

Austrian Black and Tan Hound Diet

This breed does well on high-quality dry food. You will want to keep a careful eye on her weight and not let her grow too quickly.

Rapid growth is a cause of hip dysplasia in larger breeds. She will need a low-calorie food if she starts putting on too much weight.

Austrian Black and Tan Hound Exercise

This breed loves to run. It has great endurance and can run for hours. They need space to do that. The Austrian Smooth-coated Hound would not be happy in an apartment or living in the city.

She should have acreage to run on, ideally a farm or ranch. Even a fenced-in yard is probably not enough for her unless she gets a lot of vigorous exercise on outings.

If she does not have the space and exercise she needs, she can become frustrated and bored. She is likely to be destructive in that situation. She needs at least an hour a day of vigorous exercise.

Click here to see why/how exercise is excellent solution for bad behavior.

It is most important to remember that this is a hunter who needs to work. Very few, if any, Austrians keep this dog solely as a family pet.

The Austrian Black and Tan Hound temperament is best suited to a hunting family.

Finding an Austrian Black and Tan Hound

Buying an Austrian Black and Tan Hound from a Breeder

Austrian Black and Tan Hound puppies are very difficult to find outside of Austria. The American Kennel Club (AKC) does not recognize this breed.

The United Kennel Club (UKC) does recognize the Austrian Black and Tan. However, at the time of this writing, they list no Austrian Black and Tan Hound breeders in North America or the UK.

For that reason, it is difficult to find a reliable Austrian Black and Tan Hound price.

If you have your heart set on an Austrian Black and Tan Hound puppy, you may have to resort to word of mouth. You could search for dog owner forums online. These groups exist for nearly every breed.

You could also try hunting groups, locally or online. A search for groups for scent hounds may turn up a group that could help.

As a last resort, you could try searching for European breeders. You may be able to find one that would export a puppy to you.

When You Find a Breeder

If you are fortunate enough to find a breeder, your next step should be a site visit if at all possible. You want to be sure the breeder is a responsible one.

If they are, you will see clean facilities with happy and healthy-looking dogs. You should ask if the parents are on site and if you can visit with them.

This will help you get a sense of the temperament of the parents.

You should also ask if the puppy has all of its immunizations and if there are any other health concerns with the puppies or the parents.

If the breeder is a good one, they should also have questions for you. Their first concern will be for the well-being of their puppies. They will want to be sure that pup will have a good home with you.

In the case of a sporting breed like the Austrian Hound, they will want to be sure that you are a hunting family.

Austrian Black and Tan Hound Rescue/Adoption

This is a rare breed, even in its native Austria. It’s unlikely that you would find an Austrian Black and Tan Hound for adoption in your local shelter.

At the time of this writing, an Internet search found no breed clubs or rescue organizations in North America for the Austrian Hound.

Is the Austrian Black and Tan Hound the Breed for You?

If you’re thinking about making an Austrian Black and Tan Hound a member of your family, you should consider carefully.

This breed needs a very active life and a lot of space and exercise.

She may do well in a family with a very active, outdoor lifestyle. But she is best suited to a hunting family.

If not actually hunting, then hunting and tracking field activities would be a good substitute for exercise to keep this dog physically and mentally stimulated.

Just keep in mind that she prefers activities that involve interaction with her people. And she needs to run.

If you’re committed to meeting those needs, the Austrian Hound also makes a wonderful family companion. Some call her “a hunter’s dream” for this reason.

So if you are a hunter or have a very active outdoor family, the Austrian Black and Tan Hound temperament could make this dog your own dream come true.

The cheerful Catalan Sheepdog Temperament makes this breed a fun and lively pet for many households.

The Catalan Sheepdog originated in the mountains of Northern Spain as a versatile working dog for farmers.

The Catalan Sheepdog is also sometimes known as the “Catalan Shepherd” or the “Gos D’atura.”

Today, the Catalan Sheepdog is rare, but it is beloved by the people who know the great qualities of this breed.

If you are thinking about adding a Catalan Sheepdog to your household, it is important to make sure that the Catalan Sheepdog temperament will fit into your lifestyle.

This article will provide you with some starting information about Catalan Sheepdog behaviors and traits.

Before you bring one home, make sure the Catalan Sheepdog temperament is right for you.

Five Catalan Sheepdog Temperament Traits

Below you will find some of the most common Catalan Sheepdog traits.

However, please remember that all dogs are individuals, so there will be some variation between distinct dogs within the breed.

1. Exuberant and Playful

Catalan Sheepdogs are often described as cheerful, energetic, joyful dogs!

Catalan Sheepdogs have a lot of energy—especially when they are young pups.

If you acquire one as a puppy, it is important to make sure you have enough time and stamina to keep up with their boundless energy.

These dogs are not couch potatoes. A Catalan Sheepdog will do best with a guardian who maintains an active lifestyle.

These dogs need plenty of daily exercise. Make sure you can devote at least an hour a day to exercising your Catalan Sheepdog.

Catalan Sheepdog exercise can take the form of jogging, hiking, biking, swimming, or a canine sport.

Popular canine sports include agility, herding trials, rally obedience, flyball, nosework, or disc dog.

Catalan Sheepdogs that do not receive enough exercise might display nuisance behaviors such as digging, barking, or chewing.

If your Catalan Sheepdog is becoming bored and destructive, try increasing his mental enrichment and his physical exercise.

The energetic Catalan Sheepdog temperament makes the Catalan Sheepdog a great addition to an active family, but if you live a laid-back lifestyle, this might not be the breed for you.

2. Playmates for Children

The Catalan Sheepdog is known for being a wonderful companion to children.

The exuberant and goofy Catalan Sheepdog temperament makes this dog a perfect playmate for kids.

As with all dogs, it is important to socialize your Catalan Sheepdog with children. Make sure your Catalan Sheepdog has positive experiences with children and associates children with good things (like treats).

No matter what, always supervise playtime between children and animals.

Also, be sure to teach the children in the household to treat the animals gently and not to try to interact with them when they are eating or sleeping. Never allow children to sit on the dog or to pull the dog’s hair or tail.

3. Wary of Strangers

Catalan Sheepdogs tend to be naturally watchful when it comes to strangers.

Catalan Sheepdogs are very loyal to their families, but they can be standoffish with new people.

When visitors come over, have your guests toss a few treats to your dog. Instruct them not to pet your dog right away. Rather, let your dog come to them when he feels ready.

The alert Catalan Sheepdog temperament can make this breed an excellent watch dog.

Catalan Sheepdogs will bark to alert you of any suspicious characters on your property.

Just make sure that this tendency does not get out of hand. If your Catalan Sheepdog shows any aggression towards strangers (such as nipping or snapping at guests), seek assistance from a professional dog trainer.

4. Accepting of Other Pets

Most Catalan Sheepdogs will accept other animals into their “packs” as long as the introductions are done slowly and properly.

Always take things slow when you bring a new pet into the household.

Keep the animals separated at first, and only let them interact on supervised walks.

Over time, you can allow them to have more contact, but always separate them for mealtimes. Also be sure to separate them when they are left unsupervised.

Socializing your Catalan Sheepdog from a young age will help him learn to tolerate other animals.

If you acquire your Catalan Sheepdog as a puppy, sign up for a puppy socialization class. Puppy pre-K is a great way for your puppy to learn vital canine social skills.

If you adopt your Catalan Sheepdog as an adult, you can still use positive reinforcement methods to help him become comfortable around other pets.

5. Intelligent and Trainable

Catalan Sheepdogs are very smart, cunning dogs.

They are problem solvers, and they love to use their brains.

This is great because it means that they are trainable and eager to learn new things.

However, it can also be a challenge, because they will get into mischief if they are not entertained.

Use enrichment items such as Kongs, food puzzles, busy balls, and other food dispensing toys to keep them focused. You can stock up on these items at your local pet supply store. You can even make some from supplies that you may have at home!

If you are looking for a clever, trainable dog, the Catalan Sheepdog temperament might be the kind of temperament that you are looking for!

A Brief Look at Catalan Sheepdog History

The Catalan Sheepdog is an ancient breed that has been around for many centuries. Understanding a dog’s history can help you better understand the Catalan Sheepdog temperament.

Legend has it that Charlemagne had two dogs that closely resembled Catalan Sheepdogs in 800 AD.

They were used as sentries during the Spanish Civil War.

After World War II, many people moved away from farms and moved into cities. Catalan Sheepdog numbers dwindled during this time and the breed became quite scarce. However, Catalan Sheepdogs never completely disappeared.

In 1992, a Catalan Sheepdog was selected as the official mascot of the Barcelona Olympic Games.

The United Kennel Club recognized the Catalan Sheepdog in 2006.

A Guide to Catalan Sheepdog Size and Appearance

The Catalan Sheepdog has a distinctive appearance. It is described as a “well-balanced, medium-sized herding dog with a long, rough coat.”

The average Catalan Sheepdog weight range is between 45 and 50 lbs, with males being larger than females.

The typical Catalan Sheepdog height range is between 17 and 19 inches.

Catalan Sheepdog colors can be fawn, sable, grey, black, or black and tan. At first glance, the coat appears to be a solid color. However, on closer inspection the coat is actually a subtle mixture of shades.

The tail can be long, naturally bobbed, surgically docked, or naturally tailless.

A Guide to Catalan Sheepdog Training

The smart Catalan Sheepdog temperament makes this dog an excellent candidate for training.

Catalan Sheepdogs are alert, attentive and focused on their handlers.

It is important to use positive, gentle methods with this sensitive breed.

Try to find a local trainer who uses positive reinforcement, force-free techniques.

Never use rough punishments or painful training tools, such as shock collars or pinch collars, on your Catalan Sheepdog.

Keep training sessions short and interesting to keep your dogs attention.

Once you have mastered the basics, you and your Catalan Sheepdog can sign up for more advanced classes such as herding trials, competitive obedience, or search and rescue work.

Helpful Dog Training Resource:

For help with training your Catalan Sheepdog, you should take a look at The Online Dog Trainer by Doggy Dan. Doggy Dan is an expert Dog Trainer based in New Zealand. His online resource contains Hundreds of Excellent Dog Training Videos that will take you step-by-step through the process of developing a healthy, happy well-behaved dog.

A Guide to Catalan Sheepdog Grooming

The Catalan Sheepdog has a hardy double coat that is resistant to weather.

The coat requires frequent brushing and occasional clipping, especially around the ears, feet and sanitary region.

Catalan Sheepdog shedding is moderate, but can be reduced by regular bathing and brushing.

Is the Catalan Sheepdog Hypoallergenic?

No, the Catalan Sheepdog is not hypoallergenic.

If you are looking for a dog that is hypoallergenic, check out this list of breeds.

What to Feed a Catalan Sheepdog?

Talk with your vet about the best nutrition for your Catalan Sheepdog.

If possible, feed your Catalan Sheepdog a high-quality commercial dog food that is free from animal by-products, artificial ingredients, and fillers (such as corn).

Make sure to feed your dog the appropriate amount for his age and size to avoid obesity. You can give him treats in moderation.

Staying Healthy: Catalan Sheepdog Health Issues

In general, the Catalan Sheepdog is a hardy breed with few health issues.

If you purchase your Catalan Sheepdog from a breeder, talk with the breeder about the medical history of the parents.

Make sure the breeder has performed recommended health tests such as a hip evaluation and an eye evaluation.

Talk with your veterinarian to learn more about the following conditions and their early warning signs:

Like all dogs, your Catalan Sheepdog should visit the veterinarian at least once per year for an annual exam and vaccinations.

It is imperative to keep your Catalan Sheepdog current on heartworm, flea and tick control at all times. Talk with your veterinarian about the best preventative medicine for your dog.

Spaying and neutering are highly encouraged to avoid adding to the animal overpopulation problem in this country. There are also health and behavioral benefits! Speak with your vet about scheduling this procedure at the right time for your pet.

With excellent care, the Catalan Sheepdog lifespan is between 12 years and 14 years.

Note: if you agree that your health and your dog's health should be a top priority then get a copy of The Ultimate Guide to Dog Health. Your Catalan Sheepdog friend will love you for it. This guide will help save you money, time and most of all help you keep your dog healthy.

Catalan Sheepdog Rescue and Adoption

If you think the Catalan Sheepdog temperament is a match for you, there are many options for finding the right dog for your household.

A great option is to adopt a Catalan Sheepdog that is in need of a new home.

There are many benefits to adopting a rescue dog. For example, adopted dogs are:

  • Usually older and have some prior training, including housetraining.
  • They are usually done with the destructive puppy stage.
  • They are usually calmer, and they require less attention than puppies.
  • It is also significantly cheaper to adopt a dog rather than buy one from a breeder. Plus you are saving a dog’s life!

If you would like to find a Catalan Sheepdog for adoption, and like in the UK a great place to start is with the Catalan Sheepdog Club of UK. The club can direct you to Sheepdogs that are in need of new homes.

You can also search through adoption websites such as Petfinder.com or Adoptapet.com.

Facebook and Google are also great resources for finding dogs for adoption.

Be sure to visit your local animal shelter or humane society. Even though this breed is rare in American animal shelters, you never know what you might find on any given day at your local shelter.

Ask to leave your name on file so you can be contacted if similar dogs come in.

If you choose to adopt through a rescue organization, your adoption fee will likely be between $100 and $300 depending on the organization. Most rescue dogs will come already spayed/neutered, vaccinated and vetted.

Finding a Catalan Sheepdog for Sale from a Reputable Breeder

If you decide to purchase a Catalan Sheepdog puppy from a breeder, be prepared for the price tag to be substantially higher.

The average Catalan Sheepdog price from a high-quality breeder is between $800 and $1200.

It may take some time to find Catalan Sheepdog puppies for sale from a reputable breeder. This breed is still quite scarce in the United States, and there are a limited number of breeders.

If you would like to find a Catalan Sheepdog for adoption, a great place to start is with a national breed club or a community of enthusiasts.

For example, if you live in North America, you can find an active community of Catalan Sheepdog devotees on Facebook.

If you live in Europe, there are numerous official Catalan Sheepdog Clubs in countries such as Spain and the United Kingdom (Catalan Sheepdog Club of Great Britain). Even if you live in the United States, you can still reach out to these organizations and they can put you in touch with rescue contacts in the US.

Make sure your potential breeder is highly invested in the Catalan Sheepdog temperament and health.

Once you identify a potential breeder, set up an appointment to visit the breeder in person.

Always make sure you see the property with your own eyes. Never purchase puppies over the internet or from a pet store. If you do, you may wind up with a sick puppy from a puppy mill.

A good breeder should welcome your visit. They will want to get to know you as well. Good breeders want to make sure that their puppies go to excellent homes.

Responsible breeders will not overbreed their dogs, so a puppy may not be ready immediately. You may have to be placed on a waiting list.

Conclusion: Why the Catalan Sheepdog?

The Catalan Sheepdog temperament is ideal for many people, but is not the perfect fit for every family.

Spend as much time as possible getting to know the traits of this breed before you commit to living with one for the next 14 years.

If you lead an active lifestyle and you are looking for an alert, intelligent and athletic companion, the Catalan Sheepdog temperament might be a good match for you!

The docile Braque d’Auvergne temperament makes this dog a beloved hunting companion and family pet.

The Braque d’Auvergne, also known as the Auvergne Pointer, is a beautiful gundog from the southern region of France.

The word “Braque” translates to “pointer.” So the name Braque d’Auvergne literally means “the pointer of Auvergne.”

The breed is popular in Europe but is still quite rare in the United States and Canada.

If you are thinking about adding one to your family, this article will provide you with some preliminary information about common Braque d’Auvergne traits.

Braque d’Auvergne Temperament Traits

Below you will find common components of the Braque d’Auvergne temperament.

However, keep in mind that there will always be some variation between individuals within a particular breed.

Always keep this in mind as you start to research classic Braque d’Auvergne behaviors.

An Outstanding Hunting Dog

The devoted Braque d’Auvergne temperament makes this breed an unparalleled hunting companion.

The Braque d’Auvergne is an ideal bird dog for grouse, pheasant or woodcock.

These dogs have an excellent sense of smell and they have the stamina to hunt for hours on end. They can handle rough terrain and they can even swim!

As their name implies, they “point” out game by standing with one paw up and their tail straight back when they find game. They will also retrieve the quarry after it is shot.

The Braque d’Auvergne hunting style is a little different than other dogs.

  1. They like to stay close to their owners and work as a team with the hunter.
  2. They will rarely get more than 75 yards away.
  3. And they do not like to go off and work on their own.

Some hunters do not like this trait, but Braque owners enjoy the close bond with their dog.

A Great Family Pet

The Braque d’Auvergne makes an excellent hunting dog and a wonderful family dog.

These dogs enjoy being with their people. They do not like being left outside or in a kennel after a day of hunting.

They like to come into the home and curl up by the fireplace.

Braques generally do well with children, especially if they are introduced to kids in a positive way.

It is important to supervise children when they are interacting with dogs of any breed. Make sure the children treat the dog with respect and they never tease the dog or do something painful (like sit on the dog or pull its tail).

Auvergne Pointers need a lot of attention. Make sure you have enough time to devote to this loyal breed.

If you do not spend enough time with your Braque d’Auvergne, he may become bored and lonely. He might even develop the symptoms of separation anxiety.

If you acquire one of these dogs, make sure you have a lifestyle that can accommodate a dog that wants to be with you for most of the day.

Tolerant with Other Dogs

Many people who own a Braque d’Auvergne actually own more than one.

These dogs seem to get along well with other dogs, especially when they are socialized with other dogs from a young age.

If you can find a puppy socialization class in your area, try to sign up for one when your puppy is still young. Puppy kindergarten classes are a great way for your pup to learn valuable canine social skills.

Always supervise your Braque when he interacts with other pets, and separate him into a crate or another room when you must leave him unattended.

Highly Trainable

The Braque d’Auvergne is a clever dog who loves to use his brain and please his master.

You can train your Braque to do just about anything if you are patient, consistent and positive.

Many Braques and their owners get involved in tracking, nosework, agility, therapy work or search and rescue work.

Since the Braque d’Auvergne is so smart, it is important to keep him mentally challenged.

You can keep him entertained with mental enrichment such as Kongs, busy balls and food puzzles. This is a great way to keep your Braque from getting bored and getting into mischief such as digging, barking or chewing.

Loves to Work

The Braque d’Auvergne has the heart of a working dog. He is happiest when he has a job to do.

If you are not going to use your Braque d’Auvergne as a hunting dog, you must find a constructive outlet for his energy.

This breed requires a lot of physical activity.

Braque d’Auvergne exercise can take the form of hiking, swimming, jogging, biking, or romping with other dogs at the park.

If you work long hours, consider hiring a dog walker or bringing your Braque d’Auvergne to a doggie daycare during the day.

Make sure you are prepared to dedicate at least an hour each day to physical exercise with your Braque.

If this is not feasible for your lifestyle, consider adopting an older Braque d’Auvergne or looking into other breeds.

Braque d’Auvergne History

Understanding a dog’s history can help you understand the Braque d’Auvergne temperament.

The Braque d’Auvergne may be one of the oldest pointing breeds in Europe.

It is believed that the Braque d’Auvergne is the result of crossbreeding between the Gascony Pointer and Pyrenean Braque in the 1700s.

Legend has it that the Knights of Malta were involved in the inception of this breed, although that tale has never been confirmed.

The breed nearly disappeared during WWII, but it was saved after the war by some dedicated owners and breeders.

Although the Braque d’Auvergne is not yet recognized by the American Kennel Club, it is recognized by kennel clubs in France, Germany, Spain, and the United Kingdom.

A Guide to Braque d’Auvergne Size and Appearance

The Braque d’Auvergne is a beautiful pointer. Although they are sometimes confused with the German Shorthaired Pointer, they can be differentiated from other pointing breeds by their distinctive ticking and their “bleu” black masks over their eyes.

The average Braque d’Auvergne height is between 21 and 25 inches at the withers.

The typical Braque d’Auvergne weight is between 48 lbs and 62 lbs. Males are taller and heavier than females.

Braque d’Auvergne colors are always black and white. The more common coloration is white with black patches and ticking. The rarer “Charbonne” coloration is black with white markings.

The Braque d’Auvergne breed standard states that any brown markings are a major fault.

The Auvergne Pointer’s tail can either be natural or docked at half its length.

A Guide to Braque d’Auvergne Training

The loyal Braque d’Auvergne temperament makes this dog a joy to train.

Training is a great way to strengthen your bond with your Braque d’Auvergne. It also keeps his mind active and helps him become a well-rounded canine citizen.

Obedience classes are a fun and effective way to train your pet.

If possible, sign up for a beginner’s obedience class with a reputable trainer.

Make sure you find an obedience trainer that uses force-free, positive reinforcement methods.

Never use forceful methods or physical punishment while training this sensitive and trusting breed. You could irreparably damage your relationship with your dog.

Likewise, steer clear of trainers that use painful tools such as pinch collars, shock collars or choke chains.

Keep training sessions short, upbeat and fun.

Your Braque will be eager to learn new things throughout his entire life.

Helpful Dog Training Resource:

For help with training your Braque d’Auvergne dog, you should take a look at The Online Dog Trainer by Doggy Dan. Doggy Dan is an expert Dog Trainer based in New Zealand. His online resource contains Hundreds of Excellent Dog Training Videos that will take you step-by-step through the process of developing a healthy, happy well-behaved dog.

A Guide to Braque d’Auvergne Grooming

Grooming is minimal for this low-maintenance breed.

You can keep the coat looking its best by brushing it about once per week with a soft brush. You can bathe your Braque and trim his toenails as needed.

Is the Braque d’Auvergne Hypoallergenic?

No, this breed is not hypoallergenic. If you are looking for a breed that is hypoallergenic, check out this helpful article.

Staying Healthy: Common Braque d’Auvergne Health Issues

Like all breeds, the Auvergne Pointer is prone to certain genetic health conditions.

If you acquire your dog from a breeder, talk with the breeder about health issues and genetic testing. Never purchase a puppy from a breeder unless the breeder provides proof that the parent dogs have had their hips x-rayed.

Speak with your veterinarian about the following health conditions so that you can be aware of early warning signs:

Like all dogs, your Braque d’Auvergne should visit a licensed veterinarian once per year for an annual physical exam and yearly shots.

It is crucial to keep your Braque d’Auvergne up to date on monthly heartworm prevention, flea prevention, and tick control.

Spaying and neutering is highly recommended and most breeders will require you to sign an agreement promising to have the procedure done at the appropriate age.

With excellent lifelong care, the Braque d’Auvergne lifespan is between 12 and 15 years.

Note: if you agree that your health and your dog's health should be a top priority then get a copy of The Ultimate Guide to Dog Health. Your Braque d’Auvergne friend will love you for it. This guide will help save you money, time and most of all help you keep your dog healthy.

Braque d’Auvergne Rescue and Adoption

If you decide that the Braque d’Auvergne temperament is a good match for your household, there are many benefits of finding a Braque d’Auvergne for adoption.

Below are some of the perks of adopting a rescue dog:

  • Adopted dogs often come with some prior training- including housetraining
  • They are usually past the destructive puppy chewing stage
  • They often require less exercise and attention than puppies
  • Their temperaments are more established, so you have a better idea of their personalities
  • Adoption fees are less expensive than purchasing a puppy from a breeder
  • You get to provide a loving home for a dog in need

Most dogs that are available for adoption have lost their homes through no fault of their own. Below are some of the most common reasons that a Braque d’Auvergne may become available for adoption:

  • Owner goes through a financial crisis or health crisis
  • Owner moves to a place that does not allow dogs
  • Major life changes such as new baby or divorce
  • Landlord issues, eviction

If you would like to adopt a Braque, a great place to start is with the national Braque d’Auvergne club. The club members often have a list of dogs looking for new homes.

You can also search online through websites such as Google, Facebook, Petfinder or Adoptapet.

Even though Braques are uncommon in American animal shelters, you should still visit your local shelter or humane society. You can leave your name and number on file in case a Braque d’Auvergne or a similar dog becomes available.

When you adopt through a rescue or an adoption agency, the Braque d’Auvergne cost is usually between $100 and $300 depending on the organization. This adoption fee generally includes spay/neuter, vaccines, microchip, and vetting.

Finding a Braque d’Auvergne for Sale from a Reputable Breeder

Some people choose to purchase a Braque d’Auvergne puppy from a breeder.

Braque d’Auvergne breeders are few and far between in this country, so finding one can be a challenge.

Contact the national breed club for a list of recommended breeders. Make sure the breeder you select is devoted to Braque d’Auvergne temperament and health.

Once you have identified a possible breeder, make an appointment to visit the breeder in person.

Never purchase Braque d’Auvergne puppies over the internet or through a pet store. Responsible breeders will not sell their puppies this way.

Good breeders will welcome your visit because they will be eager to meet you as well. Good breeders want to make sure that their puppies go to excellent, lifelong homes.

Since these puppies are so rare, they are expensive. The Braque d’Auvergne price from a high-quality breeder is usually over $1500 and a large deposit is usually required to be placed on a waiting list.

Conclusion: Why the Braque d’Auvergne?

The Braque d’Auvergne temperament is beloved by just about everyone who owns one.

These dogs are prized for the hunting abilities as well as their qualities that make them superb family pets.

If you are considering one of these beautiful pointers, just make sure you have the time and energy to give them the exercise, training and attention that they crave.

If you lead an active lifestyle, and you are looking for a deep bond with a dog who will want to stay by your side, the Braque d’Auvergne temperament might be a match for you.

Braque lovers will tell you that once you own a Braque d’Auvergne, you probably will never want any other breed of dog.