The Portuguese Cattle Dog temperament is fascinating. This breed (also called

Cão de Castro Laboreiro) is a Molossian-type mountain dog with a dual personality.

When he is on duty, he is a sometimes-ferocious guardian livestock dog (GLD) who takes his job of protecting his flock from wolves very seriously.


But off duty, he is a docile family companion who loves children.

Portuguese Cattle Dog Temperament

1. Intelligent

Like most working dogs, the Portuguese Cattle Dog is smart. He learns quickly, but he will only listen to one master. This makes him a training challenge.

2. Independent

The shepherd depends on the Portuguese Cattle Dog to do his job independently. He is used to making his own decisions.

3. Loyal

This dog will not take orders from other people. But he is completely obedient to his master.

4. Docile with Family

The Portuguese Cattle Dog temperament is gentle with family. This dog enjoys playing with children. He considers them his herd and is very affectionate with them.

5. Protective

The Portuguese Cattle Dog temperament is protective of his family as well as his flock.

6. Courageous

The Portuguese Cattle Dog is fearless when doing his job. He has no problem facing up to wolves.

7. Vigilant

Alertness is the defining trait of the Portuguese Cattle Dog. He is on constant patrol looking for threats. He lives with his flock night and day and watches over them from a higher spot.

Needless to say, he is an excellent watchdog as well as guard dog.

8. Ferocious

The Portuguese Cattle Dog temperament can be aggressive if he feels his charges are in danger.

9. Suspicious

He is very suspicious of strangers. He will never allow one to approach his flock.

10. Dominant

The Portuguese Cattle Dog does not do well with other dogs. He is used to being in charge and can be dog-aggressive as well.

11. Vocal

He has a unique “thunderous” voice that he uses when he senses a threat. It starts with a growl and works up to a high-pitched howling.

12. Hardy

This breed is used to living outdoors. As above, he is used to living with his flock. This is no apartment dog.

13. Adaptable

These dogs lived a nomadic lifestyle for centuries. The Portuguese Cattle Dog temperament has evolved to respond well to changing environments.

This may explain why they’re able to transition to life as family dogs so well.

Portuguese Cattle Dog History

Early History

The Cão de Castro Laboreiro (“Dog from Castro Laboreiro”) originated on the Iberian Peninsula in Portugal.

No one seems to know exactly how long this breed has been in existence. The earliest record dates back to 1882, but it’s almost certain that it has been much longer than that.

It appears to have been around for centuries, guarding farmers’ livestock and property.

In fact, it may be one of the oldest guardian livestock breeds. One theory is that the Portuguese Cattle Dog is descended from Molossers, ancient Roman war dogs.

In Decline

Today, the Cão de Castro Laboreiro is considered by some to be endangered. One estimate is that there are only 500 left in the world.


There have been many reasons for this. As foreign breeds were brought in from other countries, property owners started replacing their guard dogs with them.

These breeds included German Shepherds, Boxers, Dobermans, and Rottweilers. A rising crime rate in Portugal increased the need for these guard dogs.

Some people simply abandoned their Portuguese Cattle Dogs as farming declined in the area. Ironically, as there was less need for the Portuguese Cattle Dog, some became feral and began living like wolves themselves.

Today, there are not many Portuguese Cattle Dogs left in Portugal. Those that remain are used mostly as military dogs, police dogs, and family dogs.

Rebounding

The breed is now becoming better known outside of Portugal. The Portuguese Cattle Dog breed was recognized by the Federation Cynologique Internationale (FCI) in 1955 and by the United Kennel Club (UKC) in 2006.

Though the Portuguese Cattle Dog is beginning to be promoted as a rare breed, the American Kennel Club (AKC) does not yet recognize it.

Portuguese Cattle Dog Training

This breed is not a good choice for an inexperienced dog owner. He has been trusted to guard flocks for centuries without the need for human supervision. And this makes him very independent-minded.

The Portuguese Cattle Dog is also very suspicious of strangers and hypervigilant about protecting his flock (or family). He has even been known to be aggressive in that situation.

He is also known for taking commands only from his master and no one else. And he can be difficult to control.

All of this means that this dog needs firm, consistent training. But training methods also need to be gentle and respectful. This is a tricky balance for inexperienced dog owners to find.

This breed also needs early socialization. Because he is very stranger-suspicious, he needs to be exposed to many different people in different environments.

It’s important to remember that he can be aggressive in situations he finds threatening. But he has that gentle side that makes him a good family companion with the right training.

It’s unlikely that he would be aggressive with children. He treats them just as he does the flocks that he guards so well.

Helpful Dog Training Resource:

For help with training your Portuguese Cattle Dog, you should take a look at The Online Dog Trainer by Doggy Dan. Doggy Dan is an expert Dog Trainer based in New Zealand. His online resource contains Hundreds of Excellent Dog Training Videos that will take you step-by-step through the process of developing a healthy, happy well-behaved dog.

Portuguese Cattle Dog Appearance

General Appearance

The Portuguese Cattle Dog is a large Molosser type of dog with a sturdy, rectangular-shaped body. His back is strong and fairly long. His single coat is short, thick, and smooth.

Portuguese Cattle Dog color can be mahogany, chestnut brown, or what the locals call “mountain color.” It is mixed light and dark gray with brown or dark red brindling.

His head is fairly large and elongated with a somewhat flattened skull. The ears are triangular with rounded tips, medium-sized, and high-set.

His eyes are medium-sized and nearly triangular in shape. They can be brown, black, or hazel. The nose is large, and his nose and lips are both black.

His muzzle is long and tapers a bit. He has powerful jaws and a scissors or pincer bite.

Portuguese Cattle Dog Size

Average Portuguese Cattle Dog weight is 55-65 pounds for females, 65-75 pounds for males.

Portuguese Cattle Dog height averages 20-22 inches for females, 21-24 inches for males.

Portuguese Cattle Dog Information

Other Names

  • Cão de Castro Laboreiro.
  • Berger da Castro Laboreiro.
  • Castro Laboreiro Watch Dog.
  • Castro Laboreiro Dog.

Portuguese Cattle Dog Lifespan

The life expectancy of this breed is 12 to 14 years.

Portuguese Cattle Dog Health Issues

This is a very healthy breed with no known genetic conditions. Regardless take a look at the resource below. Better to be prepared since no dog breed is immune to illness.

Helpful Dog Health Resource:

Note: if you agree that your health and your dog's health should be a top priority then get a copy of The Ultimate Guide to Dog Health. Your doggy friend will love you for it. This guide will help save you money, time and most of all help you keep your dog healthy.

Caring for the Portuguese Cattle Dog

Portuguese Cattle Dog Grooming

This breed has a weather-resistant coat that is close to self-cleaning. He only needs a weekly brushing and a rare bath.

Of course, like all dogs, he needs routine ear cleaning, nail trimming, and toothbrushing.

Portuguese Cattle Dog Diet

Because of this dog’s high activity level, he may do best on a working-dog formula. You may want to feed him a large-breed formula. Ask your vet if you’re not sure.

Portuguese Cattle Dog Exercise

This is a hard-working breed that needs a lot of exercise. He is able to transition well to the life of a family dog, but he does best with a job to do.

If you have no livestock to protect, he will need another activity to take its place. A home with children would be a great choice for the Portuguese Cattle Dog. He would consider them his flock and protecting them his job.

But he would still need a lot of outdoor exercise. He should have large open spaces to run off-leash. A large yard would be a must.

Finding a Portuguese Cattle Dog

Buying a Portuguese Cattle Dog from a Breeder

This dog is a rare breed. Finding a Portuguese Cattle Dog for sale won’t be easy. At the time of this writing, an Internet search found one Portuguese Cattle Dog breeder in the US.

They are starting to be promoted by the rare breed market, however. They should be easier to find with time.

This breed is recognized by the UKC, so you might try searching their breeder directory. They also host forums where breeders can list their litters.


Even if you don’t find a breeder on the forums, you can post an inquiry. You may connect with someone who can tell you where to find Portuguese Cattle Dog puppies.

You might also try searching Facebook groups for Portuguese Cattle Dog breeders and owners. These groups exist for nearly every breed.

They can be a great resource. You may or may not find a breeder right away. But you can also connect with people who can tell you what it’s like to live with this breed.

Another possible source is YouTube. Many dog owners and breeds post videos of their dogs. Some also publish contact information. Again, this is a good way to connect with current owners.

If all else fails, you may have to look to Europe. You may find a breeder there who is willing to export a Portuguese Cattle Dog puppy.

You could try the FCI’s site or eurobreeder.com. They may be able to help you find a breeder.

Our best estimate of Portuguese Cattle Dog cost is from $600 to $1200.

Vetting the Breeder

If you do find a breeder of Portuguese Cattle Dog puppies, you will want to do your homework before making a purchase.

Rare breeds can be a great moneymaker for “backyard breeders” and puppy mills. Try to get trustworthy recommendations from some of the connections you make online.

When you do find a breeder, you should ask whether you can make a site visit. Even if you’re not able to do that, you should ask anyway.

If they say no, that’s a good sign that they’re hiding something. You should find another breeder. Reputable breeders welcome visits to their facilities.

You might also ask the breeder if you can see the parents and what they know about the parents’ health histories. Ask them if they have a written vet’s record of the puppy’s healthcare and immunizations.

An ethical breeder will breed only healthy dogs. They will have that documentation available. And they will guarantee the health of their puppies.

Puppy mills don’t concern themselves with the health of their pups. Or of the mothers. And they offer no health guarantees.

You may also not get the Portuguese Cattle Dog traits or behaviors that you’re expecting. Puppy mills often inbreed, which means the resulting puppies are less likely to have a predictable temperament. They are also more likely to have health issues.

Portuguese Cattle Dog Rescue/Adoption

Finding a Portuguese Cattle Dog for adoption will also be challenging. It’s not likely that you will find one of these rare dogs at a nearby shelter.

The sources we listed above would be good places to start your search. You may find information about rescue organizations or dogs that owners need to rehome.

There are some great benefits to giving an adult dog a home. The dog may already be spayed or neutered.

It would probably be housebroken. It may even be microchipped.

If it’s nearby, you may also have an opportunity to visit with the dog. You could get to know its personality to see if it’s a good fit for your family. This isn’t possible with a new puppy.

Best of all, you would be giving the quality of life to a dog that really needs it.

Is the Portuguese Cattle Dog the Right Breed for You?

There are a few questions you should ask yourself before considering this interesting but challenging breed.

Do you have the experience it takes to have control over an independent and potentially aggressive dog? Do you live in a rural environment where he would have plenty of space to run?

Can you commit to the high exercise need of this active working breed? And to the socialization he will need?

If you can answer yes to these questions, then the Portuguese Cattle Dog could be a great fit for your family.

If you have children, even better. Yours could be the ideal family to bring out the gentle and nurturing Portuguese Cattle Dog temperament.

The Jagdterrier temperament is bold and intense. These little guys may be small but they are mighty!

The Jagdterrier (pronounced “Yack Terrier”) is also known as the German Hunt Terrier or the Deutscher Jagdterrier.

If you are thinking about adding a Jagdterrier to your household, this article will provide you with an introduction to the vivacious Jagdterrier personality.

You can learn even more by speaking with Jagdterrier owners and breeders. You can also connect with the Jagdterrier community online through Facebook and other websites.

It is important to do extensive research before you bring one home to make sure you are prepared for common Jagdterrier behaviors.

These little hunting dogs are definitely not for everyone.

Like many other terriers, Jagdterriers are tenacious, courageous, energetic and intelligent.

They need a lot of exercise and mental stimulation to channel their energy into constructive outlets.

They are not usually recommended for novice dog owners or for apartment dwellers.

Jagdterrier Temperament: The Most Common Jagdterrier Traits

In this section, we will explore some of the most common components of the Jagdterrier temperament.

However, please keep in mind that all dogs are individuals, so there will always be some variation between dogs within a breed.

Your specific Jagdterrier may not display all of these characteristics.

Still, this section will provide you with an overview of the Jagdterrier temperament.

High Prey Drive

One component of the Jagdterrier temperament is a high prey drive towards smaller animals.

The Jagdterrier was bred to hunt and kill small game such as rabbits, foxes, and badgers.

This prey drive is very deeply entrenched in their DNA.

For this reason, a Jagdterrier is not generally a good choice for a home with small pets such as rabbits, ferrets or cats.

There may be some exceptions to this rule, but most terriers cannot be fully trusted with small critters.

Be very cautious if you try to introduce your Jagdterrier to other animals. Always supervise their interactions and separate them if you cannot monitor them.

Clever, Trainable

The smart Jagdterrier temperament makes this breed very trainable.

In fact, it is crucial to provide your Jagdterrier with plenty of training and mental enrichment.

Without enough mental stimulation, your Jagdterrier will easily become bored.

A bored Jagdterrier may develop unwanted behaviors such as chewing, digging, barking, or trying to escape.

You can also keep your Jagdterrier entertained with a variety of toys and food puzzles.

You can purchase interactive toys from your local pet supply store, and you can even make some yourself from common household items.

Courageous, Tenacious

Like most terriers, the Jagdterrier temperament is extremely tenacious.

Terriers are known to take on adversaries two or three times their own size!

Your Jagdterrier should be closely supervised when interacting with other dogs. A terrier will usually not back down from a fight if they are provoked.

Early socialization will help your Jagdterrier learn better social skills with other canines.

The fearless Jagdterrier temperament trait also makes this breed an excellent watchdog.

A Jagdterrier will do anything to protect his family if he feels that they are threatened.

High Energy

The Jagdterrier temperament can be described as high energy or even hyper.

These little guys need a lot of physical exercise.

Even though they are small, they are not couch potatoes or lap dogs.

If you bring home one of these dogs, you should be prepared for at least an hour of vigorous exercise per day.

Jagdterrier exercise can take the form of hiking, jogging, biking, or a canine sport.

Doggie daycare can be another great outlet for your Jagdterrier’s excess energy.

Needs a Job or a Sport

The Jagdterrier is happiest when he has a job to do.

If you do not plan to participate in hunting with your Jagdterrier, another great option is a canine sport.

There are dozens of fun and interesting canine sports.

Jagdterriers excel at sports such as barn hunt. Barn hunt is a sport that tests a dog’s ability to find vermin in an underground maze.

Other options of canine sports include agility, nosework, Frisbee, flyball, and many more!

Jagdterrier History: Where does the Jagdterrier Dog Breed come from?

The Jagdterrier is a fairly new dog breed.

The breed originated in Germany after World War I. Its name literally translates to “Hunt Terrier” in German.

The breed was developed by crossing Fox Terriers, Welsh Terriers, and Old English Wirehaired Terriers.

The result was a small, versatile, black and tan hunting terrier.

The Jagdterrier is primarily used for hunting small game, but he is brave and hardy enough to hunt large game as well.

The German Hunting Terrier Club was founded in 1926.

The Jagdterrier is recognized by the Federation Cynologique Internationale (FCI) as well as the United Kennel Club (UKC). However, it is not yet recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) at this time.

Jagdterrier Size and Appearance

The FCI breed standard describes the Jagdterrier as, “A smallish, generally black and tan, compact, well-proportioned working hunting dog.”

The average Jagdterrier height is between 13 and 16 inches at the withers.

The typical Jagdterrier weight range is between 17 and 22 pounds.

Jagdterrier colors are almost always black and tan. Small white markings are permitted on the chest and toes.

The Jagdterrier coat can be either rough or smooth.

The tail was historically docked to about 1/3 of its normal length. However, now that many countries are outlawing cosmetic surgery such as tail docking, the tail can also be left at its natural length.

Jagdterrier Training

The intelligent Jagdterrier temperament means that this breed is an excellent candidate for training.

In fact, if you own a Jagdterrier, daily training sessions are a must. Daily training will keep your dog’s mind active and engaged.

Start socialization and training at an early age if possible.

If you get your dog as a puppy, sign up for a puppy socialization class. This is a great way for your puppy to learn basic commands and also learn social skills from other canines.

If you adopt your dog as an adult, it is still a great idea to sign up for a basic obedience class with your new pet.

Just make sure you do your research and find a trainer that uses positive reinforcement methods.

Helpful Dog Training Resource:

For help with training your Jagdterrier dog, you should take a look at The Online Dog Trainer by Doggy Dan. Doggy Dan is an expert Dog Trainer based in New Zealand. His online resource contains Hundreds of Excellent Dog Training Videos that will take you step-by-step through the process of developing a healthy, happy well-behaved dog.

The Jagdterrier does not respond well to rough or forceful handling. Avoid trainers that use painful training devices such as shock collars or choke chains.

These outdated tactics are not necessary and may severely compromise your bond with your new dog.

Instead, sign up for a class that uses modern, force-free training methods. This type of training will be fun for you and your dog. It will help to strengthen your relationship.

Once you have completed basic training, you can explore more advanced activities. As previously stated, the Jagdterrier is an outstanding competitor in many canine sports including agility, barn hunt, rally obedience, and flyball.

A Guide to Jagdterrier Grooming

The Jagdterrier does not require too much effort when it comes to grooming.

Both the rough coated Jagdterrier and the smooth coated Jagdterrier need minimal upkeep.

Occasional bathing and brushing will suffice.

It is also important to provide them with regular nail trims, ear cleaning, and dental care.

Jagdterrier shedding is light and manageable.

However, the Jagdterrier is not a hypoallergenic breed. If you or someone in your family has allergies to dog dander, check out this article for a list of hypoallergenic breeds.

Staying Healthy: Jagdterrier Health Issues

Happily, the majority of Jagdterriers are healthy dogs.

However, like all breeds, Jagdterriers can be prone to certain health conditions.

Talk with your breeder and/or veterinarian to find out what to expect before you bring one home.

If you acquire your dog from a breeder, ask if they have performed any testing (such as hip or eye evaluations on their breeding dogs).

If you adopt from a rescue group, ask if there is any medical history available.

Be sure to be on the watch for the following health conditions in your Jagdterrier:

Helpful Dog Health Resource:

Note: Don't let the many issues above scare you. The best way to approach health problems is to prevent them in the first place. The Ultimate Guide to Dog Health is a great place to start. Get a copy to keep at home. It will help you prevent the painful health issues that can plague your lovely dog from expressing his winning personality and maximizing his life expectancy.

Like all dogs, your Jagterrier needs to visit a veterinarian at least once per year for an annual exam and vaccinations.

Likewise, make sure you keep your Jagdterrier up to date on flea prevention, tick prevention, and heartworm prevention all year round.

Spaying and neutering are highly recommended for all household pets. Speak with your veterinarian about the best time to schedule this procedure.

Also, speak with your vet about the best diet for your Jagdterrier. Select high-quality food without fillers or additives such as corn or animal by-products.

With good care and nutrition, the average Jagdterrier lifespan is between 10 and 12 years.

Jagdterrier Adoption and Rescue

If you decide that the Jagdterrier temperament is the right match for your household, your next step will be to find one. This may prove challenging since this is such a rare breed of dog, especially outside of Germany.

Adoption can be a great way to add a pet to your family!

The Benefits of Adoption

There are many reasons to consider adoption.

First of all, there are so many homeless pets in the country. It is very rewarding to adopt a pet and save a life!

Animals that are up for adoption are usually a little bit older and more settled. They do not require as much exercise or training as puppies.

Adoption fees are also significantly less expensive than breeder fees.

For example, when you adopt from a rescue group or an animal shelter, the adoption fee is usually between $100 and $300. This price generally includes some basic vetting.

On the other hand, when you purchase a puppy from a breeder, the Jagdterrier price can easily exceed $1000!

How to find a Jagdterrier for Adoption

A great place to start your search for a new pet is at your local animal shelter or humane society.

Even though Jagdterriers are rare in American animal shelters, the staff can direct you towards other organizations such as specialized rescue groups.

They can also keep your information on file and contact you about similar breeds.

Another great option is to search for adoptable dogs online through websites such as Facebook, Petfinder, Adoptapet, or Getyourpet.

You can also search for rescue groups that specialize in terriers and terrier mixes.

How to Find a Jagdterrier for Sale from a Reputable Breeder

Another possible option is to try to find a Jagdterrier puppy from a reputable Jagdterrier breeder.

There are very few Jagdterrier breeders in the United States, so this will require time and patience.

You can ask a representative from the American Kennel Club for referrals for good breeders.

However, it is still highly recommended that you visit the breeder in person before agreeing to do business with them.

This will allow you to check out the property and the health of the breeding dogs. A good breeder will always welcome your visit. If a breeder does not want you to visit their premises, this is a red flag!

Sadly, there are many unscrupulous breeders in the world that will try to take advantage of unsuspecting puppy buyers.

To avoid scams, never purchase Jagdterrier puppies over the internet or from a pet store.

Conclusion: Why the Jagdterrier?

The Jagdterrier temperament makes this breed a fun and lively pet.

The Jagdterrier is a great choice for anyone who is looking for an active and entertaining companion in a small package.

Do not be fooled by their size! These small terriers still need a lot of exercise and attention. Make sure you are prepared for a high energy pet before you commit to a Jagdterrier.

If you are looking for a dog that will keep you laughing and keep you on your toes, the Jagdterrier might be the perfect choice for you!

The Greek Harehound temperament can be described as confident, lively and outgoing.

The Greek Harehound is a rare breed from Greece. It also goes by the following names: Hellenic Hound, Albanian Greyhound, Greek Greyhound, Greek Saluki, Greek Hound, and the Hellenic Harehound.

The two other most common names are the Hellenic Hound and the Greek Hound. They will be used interchangeably for the purposes of this article.

This article will provide you with an introduction to the Greek Harehound temperament.

If you are thinking about adding a Hellenic Hound to your household, spend as much time as you can to get to know these unique dogs.

Owners and breeders can provide you with important insights into the Greek Harehound personality.

Before you bring one home, make sure you are ready to handle Greek Harehound behaviors.

Greek Hounds are active working dogs, so they are not suitable for all lifestyles. Owners need to be prepared to provide plenty of exercise and training.

Greek Harehound Temperament: Greek Harehound Traits

In this section, you will find some of the most common components of the Greek Harehound temperament.

However, it is important to remember that not all Greek Harehounds will display the exact same personality traits.

All dogs are individuals. Although there are commonalities within breeds, there will always be individual distinctions as well.

Keen Sense of Smell

The Greek Harehound temperament is designed to make this breed a top notch hunting dog.

The Greek Hound has an extremely powerful sense of smell.

These dogs are bred to follow their noses no matter what.

If you have one as a pet, you will need to keep this in mind. For example, you will need to keep your Greek Harehound on a leash at all times unless you are in a very secure area.

Even a well-trained hound might take off after a scent and not heed your calls.

This could be extremely dangerous if your Greek Hound dashes across a busy road or wanders so far that he becomes disoriented and lost.

Make sure your Hellenic Hound is microchipped and wearing a collar with an ID tag just in case!

Known for Strength and Stamina

The Greek Harehound temperament is energetic and intense.

These dogs are true working dogs.

They are not suited for a sedentary lifestyle.

If you own one, you will need to be prepared to provide plenty of daily exercise and mental enrichment.

Without enough activity, your Greek Harehound will become bored and destructive. He may start to exhibit nuisance behaviors such as chewing, digging, or barking.

Make sure you can devote at least an hour per day to vigorous exercise before you even consider acquiring one of these athletic dogs.

Greek Harehound exercise can include activities such as running, jogging, hiking, walking, biking or a canine sport.

Docile with other Dogs

The Greek Harehound temperament towards other dogs is usually friendly.

These dogs often hunt in packs, so they are accustomed to being around other canines.

This is especially true when your dog can be socialized with other dogs from an early age. Sign up for a puppy socialization class at the earliest opportunity.

Since Greek Hounds have a high prey drive, they are often not compatible with small pets such as cats, rabbits or ferrets. However, there can be exceptions to this rule.

If you have small pets, use caution when introducing a hound to the household. Always supervise your hound around other animals.

Aloof with Strangers

The Greek Harehound temperament is very loyal when it comes to its family, but it can be aloof with strangers.

The Greek Harehound makes a good watch dog and will alert its master to intruders on the property.

When guests come over, have them offer your dog a small treat to help with the acceptance process.

Vocal

Like most hounds, the Greek Harehound tends to be a vocal breed. Hounds have a distinctive vocalization called “baying.”

For this reason, the Greek Harehound is not a good choice for apartment dwellers.

There are certain things that you can do to prevent excessive barking. For example, make sure your Greek Harehound receives lots of daily exercise and mental stimulation.

However, if you are not fond of barking, a Greek Harehound (or any hound) is probably not the breed for you!

Greek Harehound History: Where does the Greek Harehound Dog Breed come from?

The Greek Harehound has been around for thousands of years.

As its name implies, the Greek Harehound originated in Southern Greece for the purpose of hunting rabbits.

It is believed that the Greek Harehound descended from an ancient breed called the Laconikoi Kynes.

During the age of exploration, Greek Harehounds migrated out of Greece and spread into the rest of Europe.

The Federation Cynologique Internationale recognized the Greek Harehound in 1996.

The Greek Harehound was the first Greek breed to be recognized by the FCI.

The United Kennel Club (UKC) recognized the breed ten years later.

However, the breed is still too rare in the United States to be recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC).

Today, the Greek Harehound is prevalent in its native land, but is considered a rare breed in all other countries.

Greek Harehound Size and General Appearance

The UKC breed standard describes the Hellenic Hound as, “A medium-sized, short-coated, black and tan hound that appears strong and vigorous.”

The average Greek Harehound height is between 17 inches and 22 inches.

The typical Greek Harehound weight is between 37 lbs. and 44 lbs.

Greek Harehound colors are always black and tan. A small white spot is allowed on the chest, but otherwise, no other colors are permitted.

The Greek Harehound has a long tail, long legs, and long droopy ears.

Greek Harehound Training

The clever Greek Harehound temperament makes this breed highly trainable under the right circumstances.

Some people say that hounds, including Greek Harehounds, are stubborn and difficult to train.

However, this is not completely true.

Greek Harehounds are very intelligent. It is up to the owner to channel that intelligence into good behavior.

It is ideal to start the training process early if possible.

If you acquire your Greek Hound as a puppy, sign up for a puppy kindergarten class right away. Puppy classes are a great way for your puppy to learn important social skills from other dogs.

If you adopt your Hellenic Hound as an adult, sign up for a basic obedience class with a positive reinforcement trainer.

It is important to find a trainer that uses positive, force-free training methods.

Greek Hounds, like most dogs, do not respond well to overbearing, dominance-based training.

Training should be enjoyable for you and your dog!

Once you have completed basic training, you can sign up for more advanced activities with your Greek Hound such as Nosework, Agility, Tracking or Search and Rescue.

Helpful Dog Training Resource:

For help with training your Greek Harehound dog, you should take a look at The Online Dog Trainer by Doggy Dan. Doggy Dan is an expert Dog Trainer based in New Zealand. His online resource contains Hundreds of Excellent Dog Training Videos that will take you step-by-step through the process of developing a healthy, happy well-behaved dog.

A Brief Guide to Greek Harehound Grooming

The Greek Harehound has a short, smooth coat that is easy to groom.

The Greek Harehound coat will benefit from weekly brushing and occasional bathing.

Use a firm bristle brush or a comb for weekly brushing sessions.

The Greek Harehound will shed once or twice per year. Additional brushing may be needed during shedding season.

As with all dogs, the Greek Harehound will also need periodic nail trims and dental cleanings.

Since Greek Hounds have floppy ears, they need more ear cleanings than most other dogs.

The Greek Harehound is not hypoallergenic. If you or someone in your household suffers from allergies to dog dander, check out this article for a list of hypoallergenic breeds.

Staying Healthy: Greek Harehound Health Issues

Although there are not many health studies about this uncommon breed, it appears that the Hellenic Hound is a generally healthy breed.

However, there are a few health conditions to monitor.

Talk with your breeder and/or vet about what to expect in terms of the health of this breed.

If you purchase a puppy from a breeder, talk with the breeder at great length about the medical history of the parents.

The following health conditions are sometimes noted in this breed:

Greek Harehound knee problems can include patellar luxation. This is a common knee issue where the kneecaps dislocate or slip out of their normal positions.

Like all dogs, your Hellenic Hound should visit a trusted veterinarian at least once per year.

Make sure you keep your dog up to date on flea, tick and heartworm prevention at all times.

Unless you plan to compete in the dog show circuit, spaying and neutering is highly recommended. Talk with your veterinarian about this procedure.

Feed your Greek Harehound a high-quality diet. Avoid filler ingredients such as corn or animal by-products.

With excellent care and nutrition, the Greek Harehound lifespan is generally between 11 and 12 years.

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Greek Harehound Adoption and Rescue

Once you decide that the Greek Harehound temperament is a good fit for your lifestyle, you will need to locate one to add to your family.

This may prove difficult since the Greek Harehound is a very rare breed of dog—especially in North America.

Why Adoption?

One option would be to look for a Greek Harehound for adoption.

Adoption can be a wonderful way to add a pet to your family.

There are already so many homeless dogs in the world, it can be very rewarding to provide a loving home for a pet in need.

Where to Adopt?

A great place to start your adoption search is at your local animal shelter or humane society.

Although Greek Hounds are rare in American shelters, the staff at the shelter can direct you towards other adoption resources such as specialized rescue groups.

They can also keep your information on file and call you when similar dogs become available.

You can also search online for adoptable dogs. For example, Facebook is a great avenue for viewing hounds for adoption. There are numerous “Hound Networking” groups that you can join.

Also, check out national adoption websites such as Petfinder.com, Adoptapet.com and Getyourpet.com. These websites allow you to search for specific breeds within certain states. You can also set an alert and receive emails from these websites when particular types of dogs become available near you.

When you choose to adopt a pet through an animal shelter or rescue group, the Greek Harehound cost is substantially lower than when you purchase a dog through a breeder.

Adoption fees are usually between $100 and $300 depending on the organization. This price usually includes basic veterinary care such as spaying and neutering.

Finding a Greek Harehound for Sale from a Reputable Breeder

On the other hand, when you purchase an exotic breed from a breeder, the Greek Harehound price could be well over $1,000 (excluding travel and accommodations to acquire your puppy).

Even if you can afford this price, it will still be challenging to find a Greek Harehound puppy from a responsible breeder.

Some people even travel to Greece to find one of these dogs for sale.

There are very few Greek Harehound breeders in the United States. Contact a representative at the American Kennel Club for recommendations of responsible breeders.

Never purchase Greek Harehound puppies over the internet or from a pet store. You might accidentally acquire a puppy from a puppy mill or an unscrupulous breeder.

Always take the time to visit the breeder in person. This will give you an opportunity to view the premises, meet the breeding dogs, and talk with the breeder about their breeding practices.

A good breeder will actually welcome your visit. They will want an opportunity to meet you as well and make sure that you can provide a good home to one of their puppies.

Responsible breeders will not overbreed their dogs, so even after you find a breeder, you might still have to be placed on a waiting list for a puppy to become available.

Conclusion: Why the Greek Harehound?

There are many great qualities of the Greek Harehound temperament.

These dogs are clever, active, agile, and loyal.

They make excellent hunters and outstanding companions.

Greek Harehounds need an active lifestyle, so make sure you are prepared for an energetic pet before you make a lifelong commitment to a Greek Harehound.

There’s a lot to love about the Polish Tatra Sheepdog temperament. He is a livestock guardian dog (LSG) with a gentle nature. But he is also brave enough to face a pack of wolves.

This breed is not for an inexperienced dog owner. The independence he needs to do his job well makes him difficult to train.

But the Tatra is a loving and devoted breed. In the right hands, he can contentedly transition to family life.

Polish Tatra Sheepdog Temperament

1. Intelligent

The Polish Tatra Sheepdog is a textbook example of a “thinking dog.” He is a clever strategist when it comes to fending off a wolf (or an entire pack of them).

2. Independent

As with most LGDs, the Polish Tatra Sheepdog is an independent thinker. He often needs to make instinctive decisions.

3. Loyal

The Polish Tatra Sheepdog temperament is faithful. He is devoted to his flock and his humans.

4. Protective

This is the hallmark of the Polish Tatra Sheepdog temperament, as with all LGDs.

5. Gentle

He is usually gentle with children, just as he is with the sheep he protects. Children will need to be taught to treat him with respect, though, simply because of his size.

6. Courageous

This breed is known for its bravery. A Tatra Shepherd Dog will not hesitate to face down wolves or any other threat to his charges.

7. Vigilant

The Polish Tatra Sheepdog is always alert to what’s going on in his territory. He is an ideal watchdog.

8. Vocal

Barking is a natural part of the Polish Tatra Sheepdog temperament. It’s critical to how he does his job.

He will bark at anything he finds suspicious, which makes him a great watchdog.

9. Calm

The Polish Tatra Sheepdog temperament is relaxed and easygoing until he senses a threat to his flock. He is usually calm and quiet in the house.

10. Friendly

He is happy to meet people, dogs, and other animals. He will bark to alert to suspicious strangers, but he is not aggressive toward humans.

The Polish Tatra Sheepdog will attack predators when he’s provoked but only as a last resort.

11. Hardy

The Polish Tatra Sheepdog temperament needs to be tough. They sleep outside with their flocks, even in the winter. They have thick, weatherproof coats for comfort in a cold mountain climate.

12. Adaptable

The Tatra Mountain Sheepdog adapts very well to indoor family living, as long as he gets enough outdoor exercise each day.

Polish Tatra Sheepdog History

His origins are not completely known, but the Tatra Mountain Dog is an ancient breed. They originated in Southern Poland.

The breed is believed to be descended from the Molosser dogs of Greece and Turkey. Some historians think the Tibetan Mastiff is one of his ancestors, which would mean that he has Asian roots as well.


The Tatra is a mountain dog whose primary job has been guarding sheep. But they are also used for other jobs. In some cases, they work as shepherds in the warmer months and in town in the winter, hauling carts for dairy farmers and bakers.

Some become police or military dogs. Others are mountain guides, and still, others are kept like sheep for the harvesting of their fur to be made into wool.


The Tatra Mountain Sheepdog came near to extinction during the communist rule of Poland. The breed was revived in the 1960s, probably with the help of the Hungarian Kuvasz. The Kuvasz is another large white LGD.

Three Polish Tatra Sheepdogs were brought to the US in the 1980s, and the breed spread to Canada shortly after that. It is sometimes used to guard livestock against coyotes. But it is more often kept as a family pet.

The breed was recognized by the United Kennel Club (UKC) in 1995.

The Tatra Shepherd Dog is still a rare dog outside of Poland, but it is growing in popularity in Europe and in North America.

Polish Tatra Sheepdog Training

In order to do his job properly, the Polish Tatra Sheepdog needs to an independent thinker with a strong will. These dogs were designed to be self-sufficient.

He works without human supervision most of the time. He often needs to make his own decisions.

The Polish Tatra Sheepdog traits that make an excellent shepherd also make him a training challenge.

He needs a strong trainer who is willing to be an alpha leader. He needs strict rules that are consistently enforced. Otherwise, he will trust his own instincts before he will trust yours.

You may also have to train him to control his barking. If he doesn’t have a natural flock to tend to, he will make his human family his flock.

He may take it upon himself to be “on duty” anytime he senses something unusual. His first line of defense is to bark an alert. This may be considered nuisance behavior by close neighbors.

With good training and socialization, the Polish Tatra Sheepdog can make a devoted and loving house pet. All the same, he will likely need refresher obedience training throughout his life.

Helpful Dog Training Resource:

For help with training your Polish Tatra Sheepdog, you should take a look at The Online Dog Trainer by Doggy Dan. Doggy Dan is an expert Dog Trainer based in New Zealand. His online resource contains Hundreds of Excellent Dog Training Videos that will take you step-by-step through the process of developing a healthy, happy well-behaved dog.

Polish Tatra Sheepdog Appearance

General Appearance

The Tatra is a very large dog with a powerful, compact build. He has a rectangular shape with slightly sloping back and shoulders.

He has a large head with a slightly rounded skull and a square muzzle. His ears are rather high-set and triangular. The eyes are dark brown with a gentle but alert expression. His nose is black.

His most striking feature is his beautiful coat. The Tatra is always white with no markings of any other color.

The outer coat is long and coarse to the touch. The inner coat is also thick and very dense.

His tail is thick, bushy, and set high. The tip can be curved slightly. When he’s excited, he carries it high. Otherwise, it hangs straight down.

Polish Tatra Sheepdog Size

Average Polish Tatra Sheepdog weight is 80 to 130 pounds.

Polish Tatra Sheepdog height averages 24 to 28 inches.

Polish Tatra Sheepdog Information

Other Names

  • Polish Tatra Sheepdog.
  • Tatra Shepherd Dog.
  • Polish Mountain Sheepdog.
  • Polish Mountain Dog.
  • Tatra Mountain Sheepdog.
  • Polish Mountain Herder.
  • Owczarek Podhalannski.

Polish Tatra Sheepdog Lifespan

The life expectancy of this breed is 10 to 12 years.

The Polish Tatra at Work

This dog has a very interesting working life. He’s a mountain dog from the Carpathian Mountains in the Podhale region of Poland. For centuries, he has worked as a sheepherder and guardian.

It is unusual to find this combination in one dog. Where most herders round up livestock by nipping at their heels, the Tatra uses his body to nudge them in the direction he wants them to go.

The beauty of this combination is demonstrated in his style of guarding. When a predator approaches, he will not pursue it. Instead, he will herd the sheep into tight little groups and stand his ground.

Rather than attack, he will place his body between the predator and the sheep. He attacks only as a last resort when a predator gets too close.

This keeps the sheep from panicking and running. It is because of Polish Tatra Sheepdog behaviors like this that he is considered a thinking dog.

As above, this dog is quite versatile and has been used for other types of work as well.

Polish Tatra Sheepdog Health Issues

The Polish Tatra Sheepdog is a very healthy breed with no known issues. However, there are a few conditions that are common in large breeds.

  • Hip dysplasia. A malformation of a dog’s hip joint that results in lameness, arthritis, and eventual loss of function.
  • Patellar luxation. Displacement of a kneecap.
  • Bloat. Also called gastric torsion. This is a medical emergency, so you should know the symptoms.

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Caring for the Polish Tatra Sheepdog

Polish Tatra Sheepdog Grooming

This dog’s gorgeous coat is self-cleaning for the most part. He rarely needs a bath, but he does need brushing several times a week. Otherwise, be prepared to vacuum a lot.

He will “blow his coat” in the late spring when he is an even heavier shedder. He will need daily brushing during that time.

Polish Tatra Sheepdog Diet

This dog would do well on high-quality dry food, but you may want to consider a large breed formula.

If he is a working dog, he may need food formulated for active or working dogs.

Polish Tatra Sheepdog Exercise

The Tatra Shepherd Dog has a moderately high exercise need. They are not very active when inside, but outside they are very energetic.

They are used to patrolling large areas and have developed a need to walk. As a result, they need an open rural area or a fenced-in yard to roam in and a good long walk every day.

This breed does not make a good apartment dog because of its size and its tendency to bark.

Finding a Polish Tatra Sheepdog

Finding a Polish Tatra Sheepdog Breeder

This breed is still considered rare in North America, but it is possible to find a Polish Tatra Sheepdog puppy.

At the time of this writing, we found several breeders in the US and Canada. An Internet search should turn them up.

You could also try the American Tatra breed club, the Polish Tatra Shepherd Dog Club of America (PTSCA). They maintain a breeder directory on their site.

There are also a number of videos on YouTube featuring this breed. Some posters give contact information.

Facebook dog owners’ groups are another good way to connect with current owners who could recommend a breeder.

Expect Polish Tatra Sheepdog cost to be from $800 to $1500. You may also be put on a waiting list for an upcoming litter of Polish Tatra Sheepdog puppies.

Vetting the Breeder

When you find a breeder, be very careful. You should first get trustworthy recommendations from one of the sources above. You don’t want to buy a dog from a puppy mill.

If you do, you may not get what you’re expecting. Most people choose a breed based on typical traits and temperament for that breed.

If you buy from an unethical breeder or puppy mill, you’ll be less likely to get the Polish Tatra Sheepdog traits you’re hoping for. These people breed their dogs with no concern for their “trueness to type.”

Worse, they do not care about the health or the genetic soundness of the individual dog or the breed.

These breeders often inbreed their dogs as well. This can cause all sorts of problems in the puppies they produce.

Worst of all, they usually keep their dogs in inhumane conditions. These dogs have no quality of life.

Buying a puppy from breeders like these would be perpetuating a cruel practice.

Polish Tatra Sheepdog Rescue/Adoption

If you would prefer to find a Polish Tatra Sheepdog for adoption, you probably won’t find one at your local shelter.

The breed is gaining popularity, though. It can’t hurt to alert area shelters that you’re looking for one.

Your best bet will probably be the PTCA website. They keep a breeder directory.

There are so many advantages to adopting an adult dog rather than a puppy. If the dog comes from a shelter or rescue, it will be spayed or neutered.

The dog will be up to date on its immunizations and may even be microchipped. Finally, the do will probably already be housebroken.

With an adult dog, its personality will already be formed. Hopefully, you will have a chance to spend time with the dog. You can get a sense of whether you and the dog are a good fit for each other.

That’s hard to do with a puppy. If you can’t find one locally and need to have one shipped, it's not possible at all.

Most importantly, you would have the joy of providing a good home to a dog that needs one.

Is the Polish Tatra Sheepdog the Right Breed for You?

The Polish Tatra is a working dog that can make the transition to family life quite well. But he needs proper training and socialization in order to do that.

This breed needs an experienced dog owner to help him make that transition. He is used to making his own decisions, not to following commands.

If you can commit to this for the life of the dog, the loving and loyal Polish Tatra Sheepdog temperament may be just what you’re looking for. If not, another breed would be a better choice for you.

The French Hound temperament is unique because the French Hound (or Chien Francais) isn’t just one dog. There are actually three French Hounds who have slightly different ancestries.

Even so, the only real difference that separates them is their color. The three hounds have very similar temperaments.

We will get into the three French Hound types later but first, let's get to know their temperament.

French Hound Temperament and Personality

1. Intelligent

The French Hound breeds are smart and learn easily. But they are moderately difficult to train.

2. Independent

As with most hunting breeds, they can be independent at times. They are not necessarily stubborn. They just seem single-mindedly focused on hunting.

3. Obedient

These dogs do have obedient natures. They just have a hard time focusing on tasks that aren’t related to their noses.

4. Loyal

They form strong attachments to their families and want to be near them.

5. Easygoing

With enough exercise, the French Hound temperament is laidback and relaxed at home.

6. Happy

The French Hound temperament is cheerful and lively. They get along well with both adults and children.

7. Friendly

These dogs are friendly as a rule, but some individuals can be shy, especially with strangers.

8. Adaptable

They adapt to living indoors better than most hunting dogs. But they do prefer living with at least one other dog.

9. Energetic

This is one of the defining traits of the French Hound temperament. They are very high-spirited, which can make training difficult.

10. Athletic

These breeds are known for speed and great endurance on the hunt.

11. Tenacious

The French Hound temperament is determined and hard-working. Their noses are always in “on” mode.

12. Social

Pack hunters are used to the company of other dogs. They can suffer from loneliness, depression, and separation anxiety if they are left alone for long.

These breeds are happiest living with at least one other dog, and the more, the better.

13. Vocal

Not surprisingly for a scenthound, these dogs howl, and bay, loudly and sometimes excessively. It may be impossible to train this out of them. These are definitely not apartment or city dogs.

They do, however, make good watchdogs. Don’t expect a guard dog, though. The French Hound temperament is not aggressive enough for that.

French Hound History

Overview

The French Hounds were once a single breed called the Chien Français.

Records weren’t kept of the original breed, so its exact origins are unknown. But it is widely accepted that the Chien Français was developed in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Seven scenthounds were created at that time. They resulted from crossing various French hounds with other French scenthound breeds and some with the English Foxhound.

The hounds with English ancestry were named Anglo-Français. The three with all-French blood were called Chien Français.

In 1957, the breed standards Chiens Français were separated. The Federation Cynologique Internationale (FCI) recognized them as individual breeds.

The United Kennel Club (UKC) recognized The Black and White and the Tricolore in 1996. The White and Orange may have been excluded because of its rarity.

Tricolored French Hound (Chien Français Tricolore)

The Tricolore is descended from the Poitevin. The other French scenthounds in her lineage are the Chien Ceris and the Montemboeuf. (Both are now extinct.)

White and Black French Hound (Chien Français Blanc et Noir)

The Blanc et Noir originates from the Grand Gascon Saintongeois, also now extinct. The ancestors of the Saintongeois were the Normand Hound (extinct) and the St. Hubert Hound (Bloodhound).

Chien Français Blanc et Orange (French Hound Blanc et Orange)

The Blanc et Orange was developed from the Billy. The Billy’s ancestors include the Poitevin and several breeds that are now extinct, including the Ceris, the Montemboeuf, and the Layre.

All three breeds are rare. The Blanc et Orange is the rarest, and nearly all of them are in France.

French Hound Training

The French Hound breeds are moderately difficult to train. They are generally eager to please, but they are easily distracted.

These dogs find it very hard to ignore their natural instincts. They’re ready to chase any interesting smell.

If you can get their full attention for a training session, you may not keep it for long. It’s best to keep training sessions short.

Positive reinforcement and praise work well with these breeds. Luckily, they are receptive to learning. You just need to work with their instincts.

Try combining obedience training with hunting and tracking exercises. A little creativity could go a long way here.

These breeds also need a good deal of socialization. They tend to be reserved with strangers. Some may even be shy and some are prone to separation anxiety.

They should be exposed to many different people and environments to keep them from becoming shy and anxious.

Helpful Dog Training Resource:

For help with training your French Hound dog, you should take a look at The Online Dog Trainer by Doggy Dan. Doggy Dan is an expert Dog Trainer based in New Zealand. His online resource contains Hundreds of Excellent Dog Training Videos that will take you step-by-step through the process of developing a healthy, happy well-behaved dog.

French Hound Appearance

General Appearance

The three French Hounds have individual breed standards. However, there are only minor differences between them.

They are large, elegant-looking dogs with a rectangular body (slightly longer than they are tall).

Their heads and facial features are the same except for the eyes. The head is long with a slightly domed skull.

The ears are long and pendulous, somewhat twisted, and reach to the nose. Their eyes are big and dark brown. They have a gentle, intelligent expression.

Their muzzles are almost as long as the skull and square in appearance. They have somewhat loose skin around the face but no jowls.

The neck is long graceful, with or without a dewlap. They have a straight back and a deep chest.

They have long, lean, athletic legs. Their tails are long, slim, and tapering.

French Hound Color and Coat

The coat is the primary feature that separates these three breeds.

The White and Orange French Hound

According to the breed standard, her color can be white and lemon or white and orange but never white and red.

Her coat is short and fine.

The White and Black French Hound

She must be white and black with speckling that’s blue or black. She can have tan speckling on the head, the legs, and under the tail. Also, she may have a tan “roebuck” mark on the thigh.

Her coat differs from the other two. It’s also short, but it’s coarse rather than fine.

 The Tricolor French Hound

She will have three colors with bright tan and a black mantle. She can have tan on the face with black shading. Her legs may have a tan or blue speckling. She can also have a grizzled color pattern (two or more colors blended together).

Her coat is short and fine.

Nonstandard Colors

All three dogs can be born with unusual color combinations, but the standard states that these dogs should not be bred.

French Hound Size

The average of all French Hounds’ weight is 50 to 80 pounds. The Tricolor is slightly larger and heavier than the other two breeds. They can weigh up to 90 pounds.

French Hound height averages 26 to 28 inches. Females are a little smaller than males.

French Hound Information

French Hound Lifespan

The life expectancy of this breed is 10 to 12 years.

Other Names

  • Chien Français.
  • Chien Français Blanc et Noir.
  • Chien Français Blanc et Orange.
  • Chien Français Tricolore.

French Hound Hunting

These dogs have a remarkable hunting history. The original breed survived the French Revolution and the two World Wars when many other French hounds did not.

They were originally kept by French noblemen in packs of 50 or more. The Chien Français were, and still are, masters of pack hunting.

They need little to no training to understand how to work as a team. They are amazingly skilled at communicating with each other with their baying.

Overall, these breeds are hardy and enthusiastic hunters. They can run for miles without tiring, at great speed.

The French Hounds can make good house pets, but they are hunters first. They need to be with a hunting or otherwise very active family.

French Hound Health Issues

There are so few French Hounds that there are no reliable health records for the breed. Based on similar breeds, some conditions to watch out for are:

  • Hip dysplasia. A degenerative musculoskeletal disorder of the ball-and-socket joint of a dog’s hips. It leads to osteoarthritis and eventual loss of function.
  • Ear infections. This is common to dogs with long, pendulous ears. The warm, moist environment is a perfect environment for bacteria and fungi. Regular ear cleaning is important for all dogs, but for a hound’s ears, it’s a must.
  • Eye diseases. These can include entropion, ectropion, progressive retinal atrophy, and others.

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Caring for the French Hound

French Hound Grooming

The French Hounds are fairly easy to care for as house pets. Their short coats need only weekly brushing, and they don’t need frequent baths.

If they hunt, however, they need a little more attention. They should be brushed after every outing, as they’re likely to have debris in their fur.

Their ears need to be checked for moisture or foreign bodies. They should be cleaned at least weekly. Their feet need to be checked for debris and injuries, and their nails need trimming regularly.

French Hound Diet

The French Hounds are hard-working breeds. If your French Hound is getting the exercise she needs, you may want to consider feeding her a high-performance food.

If she’s not very active, she should do well on any high-quality dry food. You might consider one that’s formulated specifically for large breeds.

French Hound Exercise

The French Hounds are breeds that are used to working hard. They are extremely energetic and need a very high level of exercise every day.

They need to have a job to do. Ideally, of course, this would be hunting. If they can’t do that, the next best thing would be a very active outdoor life.

These dogs would never be happy with a sedentary family.

They would enjoy joining you for long hikes or bike treks. They are great candidates for dog sports such as agility or rally. The best choices would be hunting trials and nose work.

These very intelligent dogs also need mental stimulation. Activities like these would also be great for that.

If these dogs don’t get enough physical and mental stimulation, you will be treated to some challenging French Hound behaviors.

If they get bored, they can be hyperactive and destructive. They will bark excessively, dig, and chew.

Finding a French Hound

Buying a French Hound from a Breeder

Unfortunately, these three breeds are very rare, even in France. If you have your heart set on a French Hound puppy, you may be in for a long wait.

At the time of this writing, we found no French Hound breeders in North America. However, these breeds are recognized by the UKC. You might try contacting them for help with locating a breeder of French Hound puppies.

You could also try searching for owners of French Hounds in Facebook groups or YouTube. There are groups available for every breed you can think of. This could be a good way to get breeder recommendations.

It may be much easier to find a breeder if you consider importing a French Hound. The FCI maintains a breeder directory for all of their breeds. You could also try eurobreeder.com.

Because of their rarity, we were not able to find a reliable estimate of French Hound cost.

French Hound Rescue/Adoption

If you would rather look for a French Hound for adoption, you will still need patience. You’re not likely to find one of these rare dogs at your local shelter.

Try connecting with the groups mentioned above. Rescue organizations often have Facebook pages. You might also try broadening your search to rescues that work with several hound breeds.

The fact that the UKC recognizes two of these breeds is a good sign. These dogs are beginning to become known in North America. The search for a French Hound should only get easier with time.

Is the French Hound the Right Breed for You?

The French Hound breeds can make wonderful pets, but they require more commitment than many other breeds.

They need an active (preferably hunting) life. They need training and socialization at levels that would be hard for first-time dog owners.

And these dogs have a pack mentality. They do best in homes that have at least one other dog.

If this doesn’t sound like your situation, then another breed would be a better choice for your family.

But if it does, the energetic and spirited French Hound temperament is sure to keep you on your toes!

If the thought of a super-skilled hunting dog who loves to be part of a family appeals to you, you should check out the Slovenský Kopov Hound temperament.

If you don’t hunt but would like a partner for active outdoor adventures, he might fit the bill there, too.

Read on to learn more about the Slovenský Kopov Hound.

Slovenský Kopov Hound Temperament

1. Intelligent

Like most hunting dogs, the Slovenský Kopov Hound is smart and learns easily.

2. Independent

The Slovenský Kopov can be very strong-willed, particularly the males. They need a trainer who can make them understand who’s in charge.

3. Loyal

The Slovenský Kopov Hound temperament if faithful and people-oriented. He loves to be with his human family.

But he will usually form an especially strong bond with his primary trainer or caretaker.

4. Happy

He has a cheerful disposition and is fun to be around.

5. Playful

He is very good with kids and loves to play with them. His exuberance is sometimes too much for small children, though. He may need to be supervised with them.

6. Energetic

He has a high energy level, like most hunting breeds. But if he’s well-exercised, he can relax nicely at home.

7. Loving

The Slovenský Kopov Hound temperament is very affectionate. He will love all of the members of his family, adults and children alike.

8. Adaptable

These dogs do well in the house or in an outside kennel. They even adapt to apartment living as long as they get enough exercise.

9. Calm

When he’s not working, the Slovenský Kopov Hound temperament is relaxed and easygoing.

10. Courageous

This is one of the defining features of the Slovenský Kopov Hound temperament. He is tenacious and fierce when facing a wild boar.

11. Alert

This breed makes a very good watchdog and guard dog. This is due to the Slovenský Kopov Hound traits of intense loyalty to family and distrust of strangers.

Aggression is not typically a component of the Slovenský Kopov Hound temperament. But he has been known to attack if provoked.

12. Hard-working

The Slovenský Kopov dog loves his job. He has excellent stamina and enthusiasm for the hunt.

13. Determined

He is a very passionate hunter who will track game for miles. And he’ll love every minute of it.

14. Hardy

The Slovakian Hound is strong and has great endurance. He’s not bothered by challenging terrain or cold weather.

15. Vocal

He is a natural bayer with a loud voice. If you have nearby neighbors, this may be an issue.

Slovenský Kopov Hound History

The Slovenský Kopov Hound (also known as the Slovakian Hound or Black Forest Hound) is an ancient breed that goes back to the Dark Ages.

Historians believe that his ancestors include the Austrian Black and Tan Hound (Brandlbracke), the Hungarian Greyhound (Magyar Agar), and the Hungarian Greyhound (Chart Polski).

This dog is beloved in its homeland. It is officially the national breed of Slovakia.

In the late 18th century, the Czechoslovakian government passed a law making it illegal for Slovenský Kopov Hound breeders to cross the Slovakian Hound with any other breed.

Following World War II, the Slovenský Kopov Hound population was dramatically reduced. A Slovakian named Koloman Slimak started a selective breeding program to restore the breed.

Ten years later, the program was considered successful, and the Slovenský Kopov Hound breed standard was written. The Federation Cynologique Internationale (FCI) accepted the Slovenský Kopov Hound in 1963.

As of recently, the Slovenský Kopov Hound is slowly gaining a presence in North America. The American Kennel Club (AKC) accepted this breed into their Foundation Stock Service in 2015.

His prey is now deer and elk rather than wild boar.

Slovenský Kopov Hound Training

The Slovakian Hound is very intelligent, so he learns quickly and easily. But, like most hounds, he is also independent-minded and can be stubborn.

For this reason, he needs firm obedience training from the very beginning. The Slovenský Kopov Hound traits that make him a great hunter may be challenging to deal with at home.

It may take many repetitions before he will obey a command perfectly. Consistency and patience will be key with this breed. Positive reinforcement works well with the Slovakian Hound.

He also needs a fairly high level of socialization to prevent shyness. This dog should be exposed to a lot of people and many situations from an early age.

He should also be socialized to small animals, particularly if he is to live with them. Although he specializes in large game, he will chase smaller creatures.

Depending on where you live, you may also want to train him to control his barking.

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Slovenský Kopov Hound Appearance

General Appearance

The Slovenský Kopov Hound is a medium-sized dog with a light but solid build. He is rectangularly shaped (length longer than height). His overall appearance is sleek and elegant.

The Slovenský Kopov Hound color is always black with tan markings. He has a short topcoat that is dense and coarse. His undercoat is also dense and thicker in winter.

His head is fairly long and rectangular in shape with a slight dome. The ears are large, triangular, and hang down beyond his lips.

He has deep-set, almond-shaped brown eyes with a lively expression. His nose is black.

His muzzle is long but not too broad. The neck is short and muscular neck.

He has a straight back that is medium in length and a broad chest. His legs are fairly short but muscular.

He has a strong, low-set, tapered tail that hangs down at rest. He carries it saber-style when he is moving.

Slovenský Kopov Hound Size

Slovenský Kopov Hound height averages 18 to 20 inches for males and 17 to 19 inches for females.

Average Slovenský Kopov Hound weight is 33 to 44 pounds.

Slovenský Kopov Hound Information

Slovenský Kopov Hound Lifespan

The life expectancy of this breed is 12 to 13 years.

Other Names

The Slovakian Hound and the Slovak Hound.

At some point, he came to be known as the Black Forest Hound in North America. But this dog has no connection with the Black Forest.

Experts believe that this name was given to the Slovakian Hound by rare dog marketers as a selling gimmick.

Hunting with a Slovenský Kopov Hound

The Slovenský Kopov dog is a scenthound with exceptional skills. He is an accomplished blood tracker with an excellent nose. He also has remarkable endurance and passion for the hunt.

This dog is a wild boar specialist. The boar has traditionally been the only game he hunts in his homeland. Although he’s not a large dog, he is fearless and tenacious.

But he is careful when he’s facing a large animal. He’s brave but not aggressive or impulsive.

He is also prized for his speed and agility and an extraordinary sense of direction.

Hunters also appreciate that even though he is comfortable to relax at home, when it’s time to work, he’s more than ready.

Slovenský Kopov Hound Health Issues

The Slovenský Kopov Hound has no known breed-specific health conditions. However, there are some conditions to look out for that are common in many working dogs and/or hounds.

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Caring for the Slovenský Kopov Hound

Slovenský Kopov Hound Grooming

Because of this dog’s short coat, he needs only occasional brushing, unless he is hunting. Then he needs his coat cleaned after every outing. He will pick up debris and parasites in the field.

This dog is a shedder, so he will need more frequent brushing during molting season. He needs only a rare bath.

His ears need to be checked and cleaned regularly. They also need to be kept dry, as he is prone to ear infections.

He also needs his nails trimmed regularly and routine toothbrushing.

Slovenský Kopov Hound Diet

This dog will do well on a high-quality dry-food diet. If he’s hunting, though, you may want to consider a working-dog formula. You will need to keep an eye on his weight to be sure he’s not getting too many calories.

Slovenský Kopov Hound Exercise

The Slovenský Kopov is a high-energy dog. He needs plenty of exercise every day to stay healthy and happy.

He is a rare hunting dog who can live in apartment setting as long as he gets enough exercise. This dog needs room to run.

Because of his high intelligence, he also needs mental stimulation. If he’s not hunting, he will need another activity to keep him busy. Dog sports such as rally and hunting trials would be an ideal way to meet his physical and mental stimulation needs.

Finding a Slovenský Kopov Hound

Buying a Slovenský Kopov Hound from a Breeder

The Slovenský Kopov Hound is not yet common in North America. But it’s beginning to be marketed here as a rare breed.

There are several Slovenský Kopov Hound breeders in the US and Canada. An Internet search should turn them up.

Hunting clubs, magazines, and online hunting forums are other possible sources for Slovenský Kopov Hound breeder information. These sites often have classified ads for puppies and upcoming litters.

Our best estimate of Slovenský Kopov Hound price is $450 for females and $400 for males.

Avoiding Online Scams

If you find a breeder online, proceed with caution. There are a lot of scam “breeders” out there who will take your money and leave you with no dog.

The most important thing you can do to protect yourself is to get trustworthy recommendations from other Slovenský Kopov Hound owners. This will help you to avoid scammers as well as puppy mills.

A good way to do this is to join an online owner group for your breed. Facebook has these groups for almost every breed you can think of.

Make connections with breed owners there. Find out where they bought their dogs.

When you find a breeder, first check with the Better Business Bureau. Then ask good questions. Do they allow site visits? Can you see the parents? What kind of health guarantee are they offering?

Are they too accommodating? For example, do they say they have many breeds to choose from? Or that there are no waiting lists?

Reputable breeders usually deal in just one breed, occasionally two or three similar ones. They are not likely to have Slovenský Kopov Hound puppies available on demand (though it does happen with lucky timing). They plan their litters carefully, and the best ones usually have waiting lists.

And is the price too good to be true? If it is…well, you know what they say. It definitely applies here.

Most of all, never agree to pay up front with a cash, check, or a bank account number. As soon as you give your payment information, you may never hear from these people again.

If you pay by credit card, you are protected from fraud by the card issuer.

Slovenský Kopov Hound Rescue/Adoption

If you would prefer to find a Slovenský Kopov Hound for adoption, it will probably be hard to find one. You’re not likely to find one of these rare dogs at your local shelter.

(Although as this breed becomes more popular in North America, they may become more available, especially if you’re willing to travel.)

An online search for Slovenský Kopov Hound rescue organizations may be the best way to find an adult dog. The Facebook groups mentioned above could also be a good resource for this.

Is the Slovenský Kopov Hound the Right Breed for You?

The Slovenský Kopov Hound is a unique hunter with a wonderful disposition. He can be a nearly ideal blend of best friend, adventure partner, and loving family dog.

Of course, there are some less desirable Slovenský Kopov Hound behaviors. But they are very trainable.

If you are not able to commit to firm training methods, proper socialization, and plenty of exercise, you would do better with a different breed.

But if you are, your family will be delighted with the Slovenský Kopov Hound temperament.